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Old Wednesday, May 29, 2013
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Post Basic Rules of Expansion

How To Write a Proverb Expansion or Expansion of an idea?
Expansion of an idea or expansion of a proverb is simple and straightforward. It involves 5 easy steps. They are:

Step 1: Understand the symbol of the words in the proverb: Most proverbs or ideas are symbolic. The name of place or animal or thing or person stands as a symbol of some quality. We have to try to understand that in the context of the proverb.

For example take the proverb, ‘Rome was not built in a day‘. Here the noun ‘Rome’ is the name of a place. We also (should) know that Rome was a great city. So what does Rome stand for? It stands for Greatness or success. (Remember it was a great city).

Or take the example of ‘All that glitters is not gold‘. Here we have the noun ‘gold’. It is the name of a thing. We know that gold is a precious metal. So what does gold stand for? It stands for precious.

Step 2: Substitute the meaning in the idea or the proverb: Take the two previous examples.

‘Rome was not built in a day’ and ‘All that glitters is not gold’. Now substitute the symbols we found out earlier in the sentences. What do we have?

‘Greatness or success was not built in a day’
‘All that glitters is not precious’
The proverb is now decoded and ready for understanding.

Step 3: Look for a story or anecdote or example or illustration: Now that you have understood what the proverb stands for or what the proverb means, we should look for a suitable example to illustrate it.

Where do we get these stories? There are plenty of them. Aesop’s fables are ideal. So are the tales of India, the Panchatantra.

We can also look for example from today’s world. We could, for example, for the proverb ‘Rome was not built in a day’, talk about the effort put in by Barack Obama to achieve greatness, and that it took many years to build it, that it did not happen overnight.

Step 4: Look for similar proverbs or ideas: “Patience, persistence and perspiration make an unbeatable combination for success” by Napoleon Hill is similar to ‘Rome was not built in a day’; so is the proverb ‘Do not judge the book by its cover’ similar to ‘All that glitters is not precious’.

Step 5: Sum up the paragraph: Use summing up words or phrases to indicate that you have finished the expansion and intend to sum it up. You could use ‘Thus’ or ‘In fine’ or ‘So’ or ‘The proverb advises that’. Let the reader know that you are signing off.

So we have 5 Steps on ‘How to do expansion of an idea or expansion of a proverb’:

Step 1: Understand the symbol of the words in the proverb
Step 2: Substitute the meaning in the idea or the proverb
Step 3: Look for a story or anecdote or example or illustration
Step 4: Look for similar proverbs or ideas
Step 5: Sum up the paragraph

This is how I do expansion of an idea or expansion of a proverb.

If you have anything to add or any question to ask, please feel free to leave a comment.
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  #2  
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Post Fools rush in where angels fear to tread

Fools rush in where angels fear to tread

Meaning

The rash or inexperienced will attempt things that wiser people are more cautious of.

Origin

'Fool' is now a more derogatory insult than it was when this proverb was coined, in the early 18th century. At that time a fool wasn't a simpleton, lacking in intelligence, simply someone who had behaved foolishly.

'Fools rush in...' has a precise derivation, in that it is a quotation from the English poet Alexander Pope's An essay on criticism, 1709:

Such shameless Bards we have; and yet 'tis true,
There are as mad, abandon'd Criticks too.
The Bookful Blockhead, ignorantly read,
With Loads of Learned Lumber in his Head,
With his own Tongue still edifies his Ears,
And always List'ning to Himself appears.
All Books he reads, and all he reads assails,
From Dryden's Fables down to Durfey's Tales.
With him, most Authors steal their Works, or buy;
Garth did not write his own Dispensary.
Name a new Play, and he's the Poet's Friend,
Nay show'd his Faults - but when wou'd Poets mend?
No Place so Sacred from such Fops is barr'd,
Nor is Paul's Church more safe than Paul's Church-yard:
Nay, fly to Altars; there they'll talk you dead;
For Fools rush in where Angels fear to tread.

The 'fools' that Pope targetted there were the literary critics of the day.

The line has been taken up by a string of notable writers since:

- Edmund Burke, in Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790:

What ought to be the heads, the hearts, the dispositions that are qualified or that dare, not only to make laws under a fixed constitution, but at one heat to strike out a totally new constitution for a great kingdom, and in every part of it, from the monarch on the throne to the vestry of a parish? But — "fools rush in where angels fear to tread".

- Thomas Hardy, in The Woodlanders, 1887:

"He felt shy of entering Grace's presence as her reconstituted lover - before definite information as to her future state was forthcoming; it seemed too nearly like the act of those who rush in where angels fear to tread."

- E. M. Forster - the title of his first novel - Where Angels Fear to Tread, 1905.

- James Joyce, in Ulysses, 1922:

"And later on at a propitious opportunity he purposed (Bloom did), without anyway prying into his private affairs on the 'fools step in where angels' principle, advising him to sever his connection with a certain budding practitioner."
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Old Wednesday, May 29, 2013
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Brilliant work brother. I just want to add one thing more to it. In expansion we always write in favour and in flow of the statement given. I mean there is no difference of opinion like we have in essays. For example, if its given that "Co-Education is good" then our every statement must be in favour of co-education. While attempting the same topic for an essay, one must provide both and conclude in one as the best way.
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Old Wednesday, May 29, 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tehman Khan View Post
Fools rush in where angels fear to tread

Meaning

The rash or inexperienced will attempt things that wiser people are more cautious of.

Origin

'Fool' is now a more derogatory insult than it was when this proverb was coined, in the early 18th century. At that time a fool wasn't a simpleton, lacking in intelligence, simply someone who had behaved foolishly.

'Fools rush in...' has a precise derivation, in that it is a quotation from the English poet Alexander Pope's An essay on criticism, 1709:

Such shameless Bards we have; and yet 'tis true,
There are as mad, abandon'd Criticks too.
The Bookful Blockhead, ignorantly read,
With Loads of Learned Lumber in his Head,
With his own Tongue still edifies his Ears,
And always List'ning to Himself appears.
All Books he reads, and all he reads assails,
From Dryden's Fables down to Durfey's Tales.
With him, most Authors steal their Works, or buy;
Garth did not write his own Dispensary.
Name a new Play, and he's the Poet's Friend,
Nay show'd his Faults - but when wou'd Poets mend?
No Place so Sacred from such Fops is barr'd,
Nor is Paul's Church more safe than Paul's Church-yard:
Nay, fly to Altars; there they'll talk you dead;
For Fools rush in where Angels fear to tread.

The 'fools' that Pope targetted there were the literary critics of the day.

The line has been taken up by a string of notable writers since:

- Edmund Burke, in Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790:

What ought to be the heads, the hearts, the dispositions that are qualified or that dare, not only to make laws under a fixed constitution, but at one heat to strike out a totally new constitution for a great kingdom, and in every part of it, from the monarch on the throne to the vestry of a parish? But — "fools rush in where angels fear to tread".

- Thomas Hardy, in The Woodlanders, 1887:

"He felt shy of entering Grace's presence as her reconstituted lover - before definite information as to her future state was forthcoming; it seemed too nearly like the act of those who rush in where angels fear to tread."

- E. M. Forster - the title of his first novel - Where Angels Fear to Tread, 1905.

- James Joyce, in Ulysses, 1922:

"And later on at a propitious opportunity he purposed (Bloom did), without anyway prying into his private affairs on the 'fools step in where angels' principle, advising him to sever his connection with a certain budding practitioner."
You stated the steps very nicely but in CSS English paper when we expand we have to do it in the form of one paragraph even the question says this. You cannot put in headings instead arrange all this in a way so as to make an impressive paragraph. And one other point is what I was told is that neither in essay nor in expansion we define the statement rather we have to start in such a way that the topic may get explained but without any definition and that too in expansion only, in essay we even don't do that (we don't explain the topic in introductory paragraph of essay).
Regards!
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I agree with Syeda. Its allowed to define the topic in Expansion but not in essay. And I agree it needs to be one whole paragraph. Mostly in such cases we support the topic with examples and hence prove the statement.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Syeda Bukhari View Post
You stated the steps very nicely but in CSS English paper when we expand we have to do it in the form of one paragraph even the question says this. You cannot put in headings instead arrange all this in a way so as to make an impressive paragraph. And one other point is what I was told is that neither in essay nor in expansion we define the statement rather we have to start in such a way that the topic may get explained but without any definition and that too in expansion only, in essay we even don't do that (we don't explain the topic in introductory paragraph of essay).
Regards!
Sister I never expanded it...that would have been a rigid approach for general, I just explained it for the consumption of all so that keeping resilience in balance everyone should make his own try
I made my own in my notebook,please.
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http://www.phrases.org.uk/
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Old Wednesday, May 29, 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tehman Khan View Post
Sister I never expanded it...that would have been a rigid approach for general, I just explained it for the consumption of all so that keeping resilience in balance everyone should make his own try
I made my own in my notebook,please.
Ok then its fine. I took it as your final expansion thats why I thought to make a correction keeping in view that if my words can help anybody I should go for it. Very well explained. Infact you write very good I got this idea by going through your first essay which has been removed.
Wish you luck!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tehman Khan View Post
How To Write a Proverb Expansion or Expansion of an idea?
Expansion of an idea or expansion of a proverb is simple and straightforward. It involves 5 easy steps. They are:

Step 1: Understand the symbol of the words in the proverb: Most proverbs or ideas are symbolic. The name of place or animal or thing or person stands as a symbol of some quality. We have to try to understand that in the context of the proverb.

For example take the proverb, ‘Rome was not built in a day‘. Here the noun ‘Rome’ is the name of a place. We also (should) know that Rome was a great city. So what does Rome stand for? It stands for Greatness or success. (Remember it was a great city).

Or take the example of ‘All that glitters is not gold‘. Here we have the noun ‘gold’. It is the name of a thing. We know that gold is a precious metal. So what does gold stand for? It stands for precious.

Step 2: Substitute the meaning in the idea or the proverb: Take the two previous examples.

‘Rome was not built in a day’ and ‘All that glitters is not gold’. Now substitute the symbols we found out earlier in the sentences. What do we have?

‘Greatness or success was not built in a day’
‘All that glitters is not precious’
The proverb is now decoded and ready for understanding.

Step 3: Look for a story or anecdote or example or illustration: Now that you have understood what the proverb stands for or what the proverb means, we should look for a suitable example to illustrate it.

Where do we get these stories? There are plenty of them. Aesop’s fables are ideal. So are the tales of India, the Panchatantra.

We can also look for example from today’s world. We could, for example, for the proverb ‘Rome was not built in a day’, talk about the effort put in by Barack Obama to achieve greatness, and that it took many years to build it, that it did not happen overnight.

Step 4: Look for similar proverbs or ideas: “Patience, persistence and perspiration make an unbeatable combination for success” by Napoleon Hill is similar to ‘Rome was not built in a day’; so is the proverb ‘Do not judge the book by its cover’ similar to ‘All that glitters is not precious’.

Step 5: Sum up the paragraph: Use summing up words or phrases to indicate that you have finished the expansion and intend to sum it up. You could use ‘Thus’ or ‘In fine’ or ‘So’ or ‘The proverb advises that’. Let the reader know that you are signing off.

So we have 5 Steps on ‘How to do expansion of an idea or expansion of a proverb’:

Step 1: Understand the symbol of the words in the proverb
Step 2: Substitute the meaning in the idea or the proverb
Step 3: Look for a story or anecdote or example or illustration
Step 4: Look for similar proverbs or ideas
Step 5: Sum up the paragraph

This is how I do expansion of an idea or expansion of a proverb.

If you have anything to add or any question to ask, please feel free to leave a comment.
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