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  #41  
Old Saturday, March 02, 2019
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can you guys guide me would i need any English mentor to cover exploring world of English and book by Martin ? or do i need to cover it on my own ? Please please if anybody reading my post kindly guide me on this subject.
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  #42  
Old Monday, March 04, 2019
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sir Irshad Ali Sodar sahb is not in PAS?
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  #43  
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Default Essay Topics

Good Topic I am too delighted to read your content I want to read more about Essay Topics. Thank You!: bow
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  #44  
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Default Is colonial mentality impeding Pakistan’s progress? [ Score Out of 100 ]

O U T L I N E

Problem Statement -

Colonial History -

Indicators -

Economical Indicator:
  • dependency culture: reliance on foreign aid
  • exporting natural resources
  • efforts to keep developed nations happy
Political Indicators:
  • conforming to status quo
  • military spending
  • no freedom of expression
Social Indicators:
  • obsession with white skin
  • obsession over English
  • workforce migration

Problem is serious:
  • interconnected problem
  • SGDs
  • climate change

Conclusion:
Solution

E S S A Y


Post-colonial Pakistan is 72-year-old as of now. Theoretically, Pakistan is an independent state, responsible for its own governance and growth. However, it is often questioned whether the independence resulted after the event of 1947 is a surface-level phenomenon. The legacy of colonialism haunts Pakistan’s economy, politics and culture. Pakistani’s are independent, physically, whereas their thoughts and emotions are still guided by their colonial experiences. Their lens of analyzing their country might not practically be their own.

The British Raj in, then, India lasted for more than 88 years (from 1858 to 1947). In such circumstances, the colonists had a great window to leech on to the subcontinent’s opportunities, draining out its resources. They brought their own system for running the colonized state; recklessly damaging the culture, governance and economy of India. Studies suggest that the British’s exploitation in the subcontinent aided their development in that era. Although the colonists were successful in damaging the economic infrastructure of India for years to come, more detrimental was their method for dealing with their subjects. As, of course, the British considered their nation to be superior, symbols of rational and scientific thinking. They planned on making the Indian nation more “cultural” and “civil”; less like their original form. Under their Raj, the British shoved their own ideas, their own culture down the throats of people. People were taught, forcefully, to obey their systems and talk to them in their terms. Had the “uncivil” people of India experienced living under more democratic circumstances before the Raj, they could have been less receptive. The British left, but their ideas stayed intact. Indians stuck to their Colonial’s enforced ideas; which made them more resentful for local knowledge.



The colonial mindset nourished a dependency culture in Pakistan. Instead of building self-dependent frameworks to cater to the country's needs, governmental institutions created a narrative of being an economically weak state that had to rely on foreign aid for survival. Pakistan receives millions of dollars, labeled as aid from the USA. However, foreign aid comes with a price tag. There is clear historical evidence suggesting that aid from foreign countries does not conform to a no-strings-attached model; with assistance comes foreign agenda. Therefore it is not surprising that Pakistan is not tapping into its true potential to keep the help-providers satisfied. Even though revenues are generated through developing value-added products, the country mostly relies on exporting its natural resources to powerful states. Pakistan's major export volumes include agricultural products, textiles, and raw materials. Little attention is paid on developing local manufacturing and technological bases. In-house production could have helped boost the economy. As Pakistan is not building upon its natural assets, countries importing from Pakistan get access to resources helping them develop their own economies. Furthermore, the multinational companies deployed in Pakistan extract its resources to manufacture goods for trade. As a result, Pakistan is getting a smaller fraction of control over its own resources. It is a two-way sword; Pakistan is draining out the scarce, valuable assets and getting pennies for exchange. Consequently, there is a need to import developed products from other countries, that too at elevated prices. This bowing-to-powerful-nation mentality also contributes to Pakistan’s need for maintaining good relations with other developed countries, especially the United States. Extra efforts are made to keep the powerful nations happy, which reflects badly on maintaining the country's sovereignty. It creates an imbalance of power. Therefore, political parties have a hard time projecting Pakistan's agenda on an international platform.

This region’s acceptance of foreign authority led to major developmental issues. In attempts to mimic the foreign traditions of governance, governmental bodies of Pakistan continued with political and governmental frameworks designed on western ideologies, instead of creating a local system. In the colonial era, a powerful ruling class emerged; consisting of people from politics, bureaucracy and military. The ruling class designed governmental and economic policies to serve their purpose. Amending laws to gain power and money. Continuing this tradition, years after the independence, the political sphere is still dominated by the rich landlords. There is an architectured system that bows down for the privileged. To get elected, aspirants need to spend millions of rupees to run their marketing campaigns. Although not legally bound, they also require support from existing political parties. It creates a downward spiral; the ruling strata keeps pushing down the working class, forcing them to not have a say in governing the country. It further deepens the divide between the rulers and the subject. Another colonial practice that ceased to continue, is heavy expenditure on the military. British required a strong army to govern their subjects when they annexed India. It made sense back then, however, it is astonishing how this exercise continues to this date. Years of military experiencing power has led the institution into creating rational for their own existence. Pakistan spends an enormous fraction of its budget on its army. It is unproportionally large compared to the GDP spent on education or health. Thus, it is of no surprise that Pakistan is not a country known for its acceptance toward opposing ideas. Freedom of speech is an alien concept. Journalists in Pakistan experience hard times in order to bring news against the rulers. Making fun of politicians or of people in power is considered a crime that is backed by law. Compared to developed countries, the bar for what qualifies as contempt is pretty low.

There is convincing evidence that suggests that the social sphere of Pakistan is not pure from the colonial mentality. Traces of inferiority complex can be found in local communities. Mirroring western culture has resulted in people obsessing over how people in the west look. The underlying motive is to be identified as a part of the ‘superior’ culture. Ramifications of this include people buying fairness products to match their superiors’ skin tone. To leverage this inferiority complex, the beauty industry propagated the idea of “fair and lovely”. The fairness products are experiencing an exponentially increasing demand. People with lighter skin are given more respect, whereas a darker shade is looked down upon even though it represents the majority of the population in Pakistan. Wanting to live the foreign legacy, has led to accepting changes that once had nothing to do with Pakistani culture. There are minor examples that include preferring to wear a dress coat over shalwar kameez (eastern attire). And detrimental changes, such as, the educated and qualified workforce of Pakistan deciding to work abroad. This trend of workforce migration has resulted in a drastic shortage of experienced labour in local communities. Another detrimental tradition is obsessing over English language. Instead of pride in native languages, the official language selected for running offices is English. Even though the language is alien and not spoken in any areas of Pakistan, people who understand the language take pride in speaking English over their mother tongues. Culturally, speaking in english is directly proportional to being intelligent, smart and rational. It symbolises status. Furthermore, it is not unusual for states with weak self-image issues to be more exceptional to foreign agenda. The west propagated this idea of a more individualistic and secular society where to achieve true modernism growth, societies need to get out of their inward-looking systems. With the passage of time, once closed knit communities are opening themselves to this idea, in hopes for future progress. Indicating that the inferiority complex is far from gone.

The reason why the disease of colonial mindset is hard to cure, is that it goes deeper in the skin, affecting the body’s core system. The problem exists within the structure; causing damage to nations’ economical, political and social spheres. Each segment supports that other to maintain the current system. Even with good intentions, the authorities can not decide to fix the issue in segments. The problem has to be dealt with holistically, as they are interlinked with another. Fixing dependency attitude in economics requires major design changes in other departments. To bring changes in the public's attitude towards their nation requires work in the political department. Altogether, It makes it difficult to work on the already complex problem. Another major issue with colonial psyche is that, like other mindset issues, it is hard to measure. What can not be measured is harder to fix.

Deep-rooted sense of status quo blinds the nation towards making progress in the equality spectrum. Pakistan is a third world country where women’s rights are suppressed even in the 21st century. Women constitute only a small amount of the workforce. Traditions like “karo kari” and “ vani” have a strong presence, especially in the rural areas of Sindh. Even Though religious and legally people are bound to give ½ of their inheritance to their daughters, it is rarely practiced. There is, also, relatively a lower tolerance for people from different religions. In extreme cases sects between the dominant religions of Pakistan, Islam, come against each other. Thus, there are fewer educational progress that leads to success as most routes come from inherited money, inherited power and inherited status. Little to which is due to a person’s own abilities. Therefore it is not surprising that this reflects badly on Pakistan’s progress against all 17 Sustainable Development Goals designed by the UN, for the year 2013. The general effort in maintaining the status quo is hindering the progress of SDGs like poverty, hunger and good health. There is little attention given to environment-centered SDGs like climate change, life on land, life below water and responsible consumption and production.

A by-product of the inferiority complex is considering oneself to be distant and unaccountable for certain issues. If the colonial psyche is to continue, the major challenge will be faced while solving the tragedy of the commons issues. A major example could be climate change. People living in the 21st century, scientifically, are the last generation that can potentially slow down climate change. It requires contribution from all countries, including but limited to Pakistan. The goal of slowing down, although achievable, requires each country to look beyond its borders, accepting the importance of other countries, their roles and how they all fit together. It is a shared responsibility. However if Pakistan sticks to its “victimised, weak, inferior nation” attitude, it would stop Pakistan from contributing its share. Problems like hunger would be highlighted in order to justify not participating in stopping climate change. The issue of climate change would be considered a problem that only first-world-countries can deal with.

Although Pakistan’s colonial past is dragging Pakistan to poor choices, understanding the underlying issues would make enormous directional changes. Achieving human welfare is not a race rather a marathon that requires collective efforts in the right direction. Once the direction is determined, it would be feasible to redefine the parameters for economic, social growth. Pakistani government can create solutions that are adjacent to local people. The political system can be redefined to be democratic according to the culture. The economic sphere can be designed to be self sustainable, where products and services are built upon Pakistan’s core value propositions. To make fundamental changes, authorities of Pakistan need to make fundamental changes in the educational system. The Nation's educational system needs to design a curriculum that encourages localised thinking. Students should be taught to idealise their own heroes, instead of introducing them to western literature and ideologies. Rather than copying ideas, they should practice making solutions that are customised for the region.



CAN SOMEONE PLEASE SCORE MY ESSAY. WHAT CAN I GET FOR THIS ESSAY, OUT OF 100 IF I WERE TO APPEAR FOR A CSS EXAM...ALSO FEEL FREE POINT OUT MY MISTAKES
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  #45  
Old Friday, March 13, 2020
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Default My attempt to the same essay

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yesha View Post
O U T L I N E

Problem Statement -

Colonial History -

Indicators -

Economical Indicator:
  • dependency culture: reliance on foreign aid
  • exporting natural resources
  • efforts to keep developed nations happy
Political Indicators:
  • conforming to status quo
  • military spending
  • no freedom of expression
Social Indicators:
  • obsession with white skin
  • obsession over English
  • workforce migration

Problem is serious:
  • interconnected problem
  • SGDs
  • climate change

Conclusion:
Solution

E S S A Y


Post-colonial Pakistan is 72-year-old as of now. Theoretically, Pakistan is an independent state, responsible for its own governance and growth. However, it is often questioned whether the independence resulted after the event of 1947 is a surface-level phenomenon. The legacy of colonialism haunts Pakistan’s economy, politics and culture. Pakistani’s are independent, physically, whereas their thoughts and emotions are still guided by their colonial experiences. Their lens of analyzing their country might not practically be their own.

The British Raj in, then, India lasted for more than 88 years (from 1858 to 1947). In such circumstances, the colonists had a great window to leech on to the subcontinent’s opportunities, draining out its resources. They brought their own system for running the colonized state; recklessly damaging the culture, governance and economy of India. Studies suggest that the British’s exploitation in the subcontinent aided their development in that era. Although the colonists were successful in damaging the economic infrastructure of India for years to come, more detrimental was their method for dealing with their subjects. As, of course, the British considered their nation to be superior, symbols of rational and scientific thinking. They planned on making the Indian nation more “cultural” and “civil”; less like their original form. Under their Raj, the British shoved their own ideas, their own culture down the throats of people. People were taught, forcefully, to obey their systems and talk to them in their terms. Had the “uncivil” people of India experienced living under more democratic circumstances before the Raj, they could have been less receptive. The British left, but their ideas stayed intact. Indians stuck to their Colonial’s enforced ideas; which made them more resentful for local knowledge.



The colonial mindset nourished a dependency culture in Pakistan. Instead of building self-dependent frameworks to cater to the country's needs, governmental institutions created a narrative of being an economically weak state that had to rely on foreign aid for survival. Pakistan receives millions of dollars, labeled as aid from the USA. However, foreign aid comes with a price tag. There is clear historical evidence suggesting that aid from foreign countries does not conform to a no-strings-attached model; with assistance comes foreign agenda. Therefore it is not surprising that Pakistan is not tapping into its true potential to keep the help-providers satisfied. Even though revenues are generated through developing value-added products, the country mostly relies on exporting its natural resources to powerful states. Pakistan's major export volumes include agricultural products, textiles, and raw materials. Little attention is paid on developing local manufacturing and technological bases. In-house production could have helped boost the economy. As Pakistan is not building upon its natural assets, countries importing from Pakistan get access to resources helping them develop their own economies. Furthermore, the multinational companies deployed in Pakistan extract its resources to manufacture goods for trade. As a result, Pakistan is getting a smaller fraction of control over its own resources. It is a two-way sword; Pakistan is draining out the scarce, valuable assets and getting pennies for exchange. Consequently, there is a need to import developed products from other countries, that too at elevated prices. This bowing-to-powerful-nation mentality also contributes to Pakistan’s need for maintaining good relations with other developed countries, especially the United States. Extra efforts are made to keep the powerful nations happy, which reflects badly on maintaining the country's sovereignty. It creates an imbalance of power. Therefore, political parties have a hard time projecting Pakistan's agenda on an international platform.

This region’s acceptance of foreign authority led to major developmental issues. In attempts to mimic the foreign traditions of governance, governmental bodies of Pakistan continued with political and governmental frameworks designed on western ideologies, instead of creating a local system. In the colonial era, a powerful ruling class emerged; consisting of people from politics, bureaucracy and military. The ruling class designed governmental and economic policies to serve their purpose. Amending laws to gain power and money. Continuing this tradition, years after the independence, the political sphere is still dominated by the rich landlords. There is an architectured system that bows down for the privileged. To get elected, aspirants need to spend millions of rupees to run their marketing campaigns. Although not legally bound, they also require support from existing political parties. It creates a downward spiral; the ruling strata keeps pushing down the working class, forcing them to not have a say in governing the country. It further deepens the divide between the rulers and the subject. Another colonial practice that ceased to continue, is heavy expenditure on the military. British required a strong army to govern their subjects when they annexed India. It made sense back then, however, it is astonishing how this exercise continues to this date. Years of military experiencing power has led the institution into creating rational for their own existence. Pakistan spends an enormous fraction of its budget on its army. It is unproportionally large compared to the GDP spent on education or health. Thus, it is of no surprise that Pakistan is not a country known for its acceptance toward opposing ideas. Freedom of speech is an alien concept. Journalists in Pakistan experience hard times in order to bring news against the rulers. Making fun of politicians or of people in power is considered a crime that is backed by law. Compared to developed countries, the bar for what qualifies as contempt is pretty low.

There is convincing evidence that suggests that the social sphere of Pakistan is not pure from the colonial mentality. Traces of inferiority complex can be found in local communities. Mirroring western culture has resulted in people obsessing over how people in the west look. The underlying motive is to be identified as a part of the ‘superior’ culture. Ramifications of this include people buying fairness products to match their superiors’ skin tone. To leverage this inferiority complex, the beauty industry propagated the idea of “fair and lovely”. The fairness products are experiencing an exponentially increasing demand. People with lighter skin are given more respect, whereas a darker shade is looked down upon even though it represents the majority of the population in Pakistan. Wanting to live the foreign legacy, has led to accepting changes that once had nothing to do with Pakistani culture. There are minor examples that include preferring to wear a dress coat over shalwar kameez (eastern attire). And detrimental changes, such as, the educated and qualified workforce of Pakistan deciding to work abroad. This trend of workforce migration has resulted in a drastic shortage of experienced labour in local communities. Another detrimental tradition is obsessing over English language. Instead of pride in native languages, the official language selected for running offices is English. Even though the language is alien and not spoken in any areas of Pakistan, people who understand the language take pride in speaking English over their mother tongues. Culturally, speaking in english is directly proportional to being intelligent, smart and rational. It symbolises status. Furthermore, it is not unusual for states with weak self-image issues to be more exceptional to foreign agenda. The west propagated this idea of a more individualistic and secular society where to achieve true modernism growth, societies need to get out of their inward-looking systems. With the passage of time, once closed knit communities are opening themselves to this idea, in hopes for future progress. Indicating that the inferiority complex is far from gone.

The reason why the disease of colonial mindset is hard to cure, is that it goes deeper in the skin, affecting the body’s core system. The problem exists within the structure; causing damage to nations’ economical, political and social spheres. Each segment supports that other to maintain the current system. Even with good intentions, the authorities can not decide to fix the issue in segments. The problem has to be dealt with holistically, as they are interlinked with another. Fixing dependency attitude in economics requires major design changes in other departments. To bring changes in the public's attitude towards their nation requires work in the political department. Altogether, It makes it difficult to work on the already complex problem. Another major issue with colonial psyche is that, like other mindset issues, it is hard to measure. What can not be measured is harder to fix.

Deep-rooted sense of status quo blinds the nation towards making progress in the equality spectrum. Pakistan is a third world country where women’s rights are suppressed even in the 21st century. Women constitute only a small amount of the workforce. Traditions like “karo kari” and “ vani” have a strong presence, especially in the rural areas of Sindh. Even Though religious and legally people are bound to give ½ of their inheritance to their daughters, it is rarely practiced. There is, also, relatively a lower tolerance for people from different religions. In extreme cases sects between the dominant religions of Pakistan, Islam, come against each other. Thus, there are fewer educational progress that leads to success as most routes come from inherited money, inherited power and inherited status. Little to which is due to a person’s own abilities. Therefore it is not surprising that this reflects badly on Pakistan’s progress against all 17 Sustainable Development Goals designed by the UN, for the year 2013. The general effort in maintaining the status quo is hindering the progress of SDGs like poverty, hunger and good health. There is little attention given to environment-centered SDGs like climate change, life on land, life below water and responsible consumption and production.

A by-product of the inferiority complex is considering oneself to be distant and unaccountable for certain issues. If the colonial psyche is to continue, the major challenge will be faced while solving the tragedy of the commons issues. A major example could be climate change. People living in the 21st century, scientifically, are the last generation that can potentially slow down climate change. It requires contribution from all countries, including but limited to Pakistan. The goal of slowing down, although achievable, requires each country to look beyond its borders, accepting the importance of other countries, their roles and how they all fit together. It is a shared responsibility. However if Pakistan sticks to its “victimised, weak, inferior nation” attitude, it would stop Pakistan from contributing its share. Problems like hunger would be highlighted in order to justify not participating in stopping climate change. The issue of climate change would be considered a problem that only first-world-countries can deal with.

Although Pakistan’s colonial past is dragging Pakistan to poor choices, understanding the underlying issues would make enormous directional changes. Achieving human welfare is not a race rather a marathon that requires collective efforts in the right direction. Once the direction is determined, it would be feasible to redefine the parameters for economic, social growth. Pakistani government can create solutions that are adjacent to local people. The political system can be redefined to be democratic according to the culture. The economic sphere can be designed to be self sustainable, where products and services are built upon Pakistan’s core value propositions. To make fundamental changes, authorities of Pakistan need to make fundamental changes in the educational system. The Nation's educational system needs to design a curriculum that encourages localised thinking. Students should be taught to idealise their own heroes, instead of introducing them to western literature and ideologies. Rather than copying ideas, they should practice making solutions that are customised for the region.



CAN SOMEONE PLEASE SCORE MY ESSAY. WHAT CAN I GET FOR THIS ESSAY, OUT OF 100 IF I WERE TO APPEAR FOR A CSS EXAM...ALSO FEEL FREE POINT OUT MY MISTAKES

IS colonial legacy impending Pakistan’s progress?
1. Thesis: Colonial legacies have played a significant role in thwarting the socio-cultural, political and economic progress of Pakistan. Through infesting state institutions, education system and social life, colonial legacy has dealt a huge blow the development of Pakistan.

2. Colonial footprints can be observed in every sector

a. Colonial impression in bureaucracy has resulted in red-tapism, buck passing and inefficiencies.
b. Justice system of Pakistan has failed to cater to the needs of the society; thus, creating a huge schism in society.
c. Prevalence of elite capture and political patronage has thwarted the fruits of governance to reach wider citizenry.
d. Inefficient and obsoleted education system has resulted in creation of an army of pen-pushers and brown sahibs.
e. Democratic apparatus has become hostage to the colonial mindset; thereby making it non-inclusive.
f. Xenocentrism has created a permanent abode in our culture through infatuation with English language.

3. As a consequence of exploitation of sub-continent, Britishers also left some positive impacts

a. Formalization of governance system through establishment of standardized methods of governance.

4. Conclusion
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