Thursday, June 29, 2017
07:13 AM (GMT +5)

Go Back   CSS Forums > General > News & Articles > Dawn

Reply Share Thread: Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook     Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter     Submit Thread to Google+ Google+    
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #11  
Old Wednesday, August 24, 2005
Adil Memon's Avatar
37th Common
Medal of Appreciation: Awarded to appreciate member's contribution on forum. (Academic and professional achievements do not make you eligible for this medal) - Issue reason: CSP Medal: Awarded to those Members of the forum who are serving CSP Officers - Issue reason: CE 2008 - Merit 120
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Gujranwala
Posts: 1,025
Thanks: 334
Thanked 668 Times in 279 Posts
Adil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really nice
Default

Concept of worship

By Dr. Khalid Mahmood Shaikh


Islam is not simply confined to prayers, rituals or some other religious practices. It is spread over a wide spectrum of life. It would be no exaggeration to claim that the concept of Ibadat in Islam includes every act or deed that we perform according to the Quranic code and Sunnah.

We will be either rewarded or punished on the Day of Reckoning for every act that we do in our lifetime. Therefore, every good deed that is carried out for the sake of Allah in accordance with the Shariat is, in fact, an act of Ibadat.

The Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) says: "The whole of earth is declared a place of worship for me." (Sahih Muslim) It gives a clear conception of Ibadat in Islam. The whole earth is declared a mosque, a sacred place where our activities are closely watched by our Creator.

Every good deed that we perform comes under the heading of Ibadat. At one time the Prophet remarked that the one who removes the sadness of his brother and entertains him with a pleasant smile is the noblest of men.

He also says that person who earns his livelihood by lawful means to feed his children is a greater abid (worshipper) than his brother who is simply absorbed in ritual worship.

Before the advent of Islam all the worship and prayers were meant to please God. Offerings were made at the gods' altars to please them. Islam has revolutionized the very concept of Ibadat.

In Islam the objective of Ibadat is to reform and build up one is character. In Islam, too, the purpose of Ibadat is to seek the pleasure of Allah. But it is sought through following and obeying His commands and injunctions. It aims at the moral and spiritual development of the believer. Ibadat has direct bearing and impact on one's character and behaviour.

Our worship and prayers must change our thinking and behaviour. If no change and improvement takes place, it means that acts of Ibadat have lost all their effectiveness for us. We are no more receptive to them.

It doesn't mean that Ibadat have lost their inherent effectiveness. It is just like the fire that doesn't burn the wet wood. But you can't say that the fire has lost its capability. The fire does burn but the wood has lost its receptivity. Just take the example of salah.

The Quran says: "O believers! seek help in patience and salah." (2:153) Two things are necessary in order to build strength to bear the heavy responsibility of living life in accord with the orders of Allah: developing patience, perseverance and steadfastness from within; and invoking our minds, hearts and souls to reinforce and strengthen patience with the physical act of salah. At another place in the Quran Allah says: "Indeed salah forbids all indecent deeds and evil." (45:29)

If a person offers his five prescribed prayers regularly but along with it he does not stop from doing wrong things, it clearly indicates that his salah has no more moral and spiritual impact on his behaviour and conduct.

All our worship and prayers do not add in the least to his kingdom. God does not depend upon his creatures to be praised. He is free from all want and praise. Whatever a man does, he does it for his own benefit. Allah is 'al-Ghani' and 'al-Hameed.' He says: "He who strives does so for himself. Verily God is independent of the creatures of the world." (29:5).

We are always after the quantity and are least concerned with the quality whereas God Almighty demands from us the quality. Even the smallest act that is done with Ikhlas (sincerity of purpose) and in accord with Shariah is highly valued and weighs heavier in the sight of Allah than the greatest act of Ibadat that is performed without Ikhlas/ we miss the quality and essence of Ibadat.

It is the quality and essence of Ibadat that changes the thought and behaviour of a person who enters the fold of Islam. It, in fact, builds up a strong character in him. A perceptible change takes place in his attitude and behaviour.

He undergoes a continuous process of moral and spiritual improvement. This world, according to Islam is a place of trial for us. We have been given a fixed period of life during which we are being judged.

All our activities are closely watched by our Creater who will reward or punish us for our good or bad deeds on the Day of Reckoning. And during this period of life whatever God Almighty has bestowed upon us in the form of offspring, wealth, property and whatever sufferings, pains, miseries and tribulations we undergo are, in fact, all trials and tests.

If in this world, Allah has blessed some people with affluence and some with little riches or has deprived others altogether, this does not mean that He has done it on merit. But He has rather planned it purposely in order to try and test humankind.

This distribution of material goods as well as power opportunities etc. is in accord with the Divine plan and purpose. But ignorant people cannot understand this. The Quran has explicitly mentioned it in Surah al-An'am. "It is He who made you trustees on the earth and exalted some in rank over others in order to try you by what He has given you." (6:165).

In case of blessings and favours that are lavished upon us, we are being evaluated by Allah to see how much we are grateful to Him and in case of sufferings and loss of life and property we are being tested that how much we show patience and perseverance. According to an Hadith: "Iman (Faith) is made up of two halves: one half is sabr another half is shukr."

This tradition sums up Iman in a few words. In other words Islam can be easily defined and explained in terms of 'sabr' and 'shukr.' Hazrat Ali says that Iman is like a bird that has two wings one is that of sabr and the other is that of shukr.

Man's gratitude to Allah is not a thing that benefits Allah, for Allah is high above all needs. It does not add to God's glory and honour in the least. If a man adopts an attitude and behaviour of thankfulness and gratitude, it is for his own benefit. It, in fact, improves his own soul and gives him a higher rank in the life to come.

We express our gratitude to Allah for his favours and bounties. Shukr is the very basis of faith (iman), religion (din) and obedience to Allah. WE thank Allah for the guidance He sent us through His messengers and prophets. To give thanks is to show by our conduct and behaviour that we appreciate the gifts of Allah and use them in His service.

The Quranic meaning of having sabr includes having patience, forbearance and endurance. It is to exercise self-control and restraint in all circumstances. It is to be constant and steadfast.

It denotes will power, firm resolve and control over one's animal desires. A believer can overcome the internal temptations and all of the external obstacles he/she faces on a daily basis.

It is specially important for a believer to have this steadfastness, this endurance in difficult times, for it is in these times that one's faith is truly tested.

The objective of all Ibadat is to inculcate in the believer the qualities of sabr and shukr. Islam has changed and revolutionized the very concept of Ibadat that has been accepted and practised for centuries.

Before Islam the concept and objectives of Ibadat were confined and limited to mere worship and to please Got. It was not concerned with character-building. Moral and spiritual development of the individual were not among his objectives.

In Islam, the Ibadat has direct bearing on one's mind and character. If it does not bring about any substantial change in our attitude, behaviour and conduct, it is quite clear that it has lost all its effectiveness for us. When Allah has explicitly declared in his Book that the Ibadat has a deep impact on the mind and conduct of a believer, it becomes all the more necessary to review our modes of Ibadat.
__________________
"The race is not over because I haven't won yet."

Adil Memon
Police Service of Pakistan (P.S.P)
37th Common Training Program
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Adil Memon For This Useful Post:
hassamniazi (Saturday, October 30, 2010), pisceankhan (Friday, August 08, 2014), saba mushtaq (Friday, January 30, 2015), WaqarMMD (Wednesday, August 03, 2016)
  #12  
Old Wednesday, August 24, 2005
Adil Memon's Avatar
37th Common
Medal of Appreciation: Awarded to appreciate member's contribution on forum. (Academic and professional achievements do not make you eligible for this medal) - Issue reason: CSP Medal: Awarded to those Members of the forum who are serving CSP Officers - Issue reason: CE 2008 - Merit 120
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Gujranwala
Posts: 1,025
Thanks: 334
Thanked 668 Times in 279 Posts
Adil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really nice
Default

Curse of sectarianism

By Qazi Faez Isa



The former Malaysian prime minister, Dr Mahathir, identifies "sectarianism as ummah's curse". The "fragmentation of a single, simple and forthright religion" resulting in Muslims becoming "backward, weak and unable to deal with the multitude of challenges they now face".

Mohammad Ali Jinnah was born into a Shia Khoja household, but never professed adherence to any divisive sect. When matters of his estate came to be considered before the Sindh High Court, it was declared that our leader was simply a Muslim.

Sectarian violence in the country is rampant; murderers kill those who do not belong to their sect. Seeds of fragmentation and intolerance sprout in the swamp of leaky governmental resolve. Weeds take root, are cultivated and entwine their trunks chokingly around the body politic.

General Ziaul Haq was Pakistan's first ruler to use Islam to perpetuate himself. He categorized citizens into sects. A ruler who divides his people into sects is a mufsidun, that is one who commits great sins and crimes, an oppressor, a tyrant. "Verily, Firaun (Pharaoh) exalted himself in the land and made its people sects ... Verily, he was of the Mufsidun" (28:4).

The Shia and the Sunni came to have different legal obligations. The Hudood and other "Islam"-labelled laws in respect of the crimes of murder, rape and theft were applied on the basis of sectarian interpretation.

General Zia also granted madressahs the power to award BA and MA degrees in Islamic Studies. Each sect and sub-sect (maslak) was permitted to teach its own curriculum.

Degrees were obtained without acquiring knowledge of all aspects of the discipline. The Shias demanded and got exemption from the compulsory deduction of Zakat. Unity with the sect and not the faith, became important.

The question of sect (shiah), division (firqa), dissension (fitnah) and groups (hizb) has been considered in the Holy Quran. "...Do not be divided (tafarraqu) in religion" (42:13). "...And be not of al-mushrikun (hypocrites, dividers, polytheists).

Of those who split up (farqawa) their religion and become sects, each sect rejoicing in that which is with it" (30:31 and 32). "And be not as those who divided (tafraqu) and differed (ikhtalafu) among themselves..." (3:105).

"And verily, this is My Straight Path (serate mustaqeema), so follow it, and follow not other paths (fatafaraqa), for they will separate you away from His path. This He has ordained for you that you may become the pious (al-muttaqun)" (6:153).

The path is clear and the pitfalls identified. As to the consequences of disobedience, "Say: 'He has power to send torment on you from above or from under your feet, or to cover you with confusion in sects (shiaan), and make you to taste the violence of one another'. "See how variously We explain the Ayat [signs] so that they may understand" (6:65)

The gunshot wound, the devastating bomb and the exploding grenade in our sectarian midst, has made us taste blood, as we trudge the sectarian divide. Most men and women blindly following their parents schismatic proclivities. A child in his innocence wants to know, "What a Sunni or a Shia is?"

The difference in fiqh may be unknown to the parents but the prejudice is passed on. Teachings of the faith lie beneath the murky waters of sectarian practices, adherence to which is vigorous and abiding.

The Quran continuously confirms the timeless quality of the Message. "But they (men) have broken their religion among them into sects, each group rejoicing in what is with it" (23:53). The words "what is with it" excludes the sacred whole.

The invader in Iraq knows about the 'Sunni Triangle' and about the Shiah in the south before he has learnt anything about Islam, or maybe he perceives these divisions as Islamic.

The Shiah Northern Alliance fought the Sunni Taliban in Afghanistan, and their neighbours resolutely stood by their favoured sect. Sect precedes faith in these divisive times.

The prescription is provided by The Book: "Verily, those who split up (faraqu) their religion and break up into sects, you have no concern with them in the least. Their affairs is only with Allah, who then will tell them what they used to do" (6:159).

The simple act of prostrating towards the Kaaba in worship of the One Lord made complicated by the array of mutually exclusive venues. Which mosque should one then go to pray in? First, where not to go: "And for those who put up a mosque to harm and cause disbelief and to disunite the believers... Never stand you therein" (9:107/108).

A mosque where another is invoked along with Allah, has become the practice in certain sects, and must also be avoided. "The mosques are for Allah: so invoke not anyone along with Allah" (72:18). And then, the mosque in which we should bow our heads in surrender to the Creator: "the mosque whose foundation was laid from the first day on piety" (9:108).

To abide by the Quran, habits need to be broken and prejudices abandoned by stepping out of our trenched beliefs (mazhab and maslak) and abandoning the practice of hurling abuse.

To save our selves from violence at each other's hands in this world and from the pit of the fire in the hereafter. "...And be not divided among yourselves, and remember Allah's Favour on you, for you were enemies one to another but He joined your hearts together, so that, by His Grace, you became brethren, and you were on the brink of a pit of fire, and He saved you from it. Thus Allah makes His Ayat clear to you, that you may be guided" (3:103)

We are "a single community (ummah)" (21:92) and must not "dispute (tanazalu) with one another" (8:46). But the study of differences amongst various schools of thought (mazahib; singular mazhab) has become a specialty. Abu al Darda, a companion of the Prophet, is reported to have said, "[To say] 'I do not know' is half of knowledge".

Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) repeatedly warned: "Do not engage in disagreement thereby causing discord among your hearts". When two Muslims were loudly arguing in disagreement about the meaning of a Quranic verse he said: "People before you perished only because of their disagreement about the Scripture".

In his famous sermon delivered at Arafat he said that "every Muslim is a Muslim's brother, and that Muslims are brethren". He abhorred fitnah (dissension). Shortly before his death he said, "O people the fire has been kindled, and dissension has been set in like segments of a dark night".

Hatred is generated in the names of the early Caliphs, but their conduct was exemplary. Abu Sufyan came to Hazrat Ali, after Hazrat Abu Bakar became Caliph, saying; "O Abu [father of] Hasan, stretch out your hand so that I may give you the oath of allegiance".

Hazrat Ali rebuked him: "By God, you do not intend anything but [to stir up] dissension (fitnah). We do not need your advice". Hazrat Umar during his Caliphate summoned a lady who was reported to be of ill repute. His summons scared her and she miscarried.

Hazrat Umar consulted the companions of the Prophet on whether he was responsible and had to pay diyah (compensation) to the mother. Some of the companions exonerated him of all blame.

He then asked Hazrat Ali, who replied: "If what these companions said is what they really think, then their opinion is wrong. But if they said that in order to please you, they have not given you proper advice. I believe that you have to pay compensation for the child."

The Khalifa accepted Hazrat Ali's opinion and acted upon it. Al Gazzali noted that amongst certain religious scholars there were "devalued seekers of patronage from rulers" and also those "who busied themselves in passing fatwas".

The condition afflicting the Ummah (Muslim community) noted by him, about nine hundred years ago, is similar today. "The floodgates of disputation gave rise to terrible fanaticisms and animosities which, in turn, led to bloodshed and destruction of Muslim lands" - consequence of the perversion of simple truths.
__________________
"The race is not over because I haven't won yet."

Adil Memon
Police Service of Pakistan (P.S.P)
37th Common Training Program
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Adil Memon For This Useful Post:
pisceankhan (Friday, August 08, 2014)
  #13  
Old Wednesday, August 24, 2005
Adil Memon's Avatar
37th Common
Medal of Appreciation: Awarded to appreciate member's contribution on forum. (Academic and professional achievements do not make you eligible for this medal) - Issue reason: CSP Medal: Awarded to those Members of the forum who are serving CSP Officers - Issue reason: CE 2008 - Merit 120
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Gujranwala
Posts: 1,025
Thanks: 334
Thanked 668 Times in 279 Posts
Adil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really nice
Default

Defining the Islamic state

By Haider Zaman



The Holy Quran provides a clear pointer to the notion of a Muslim state with a clear character for those in power in such a state when it says "(They are) those who, when We give them power in the land, establish regular prayers, and give regular charity and enjoin what is right and forbid what is wrong" (22:41).

The reference to the power in the land does imply the establishment of a state. The existence of power without a state can be meaningless and may rather lead to disorder and chaos. It is true that some of that which is right can be promoted and some of that which is wrong can be forbidden through preaching, counselling and exemplifying i.e., by setting examples.

But doing some of the right things can be more appropriately enjoined and some of the wrong things can be effectively forbidden through the machinery of state only. Any attempt other than through the machinery of state may result in chaos.

Thus, there can be a Muslim state with the majority of its citizens being Muslims and forming part of the Muslim ummah, and at the same time be identified as a nation with a different name along with all other inhabitants of that state.

The Quran does not prescribe any particular type or form of government. It means that Allah in His Wisdom did not deem it appropriate to tie up the believers to a particular form of government.

Allah was, in fact, well aware of the changes taking place in the social and political fields and, therefore, left the choice with the believers to exercise in accordance with the requirements of the time.

The Quran, however, provides some definite guidance in regard to who could be the persons who should discharge the responsibilities of the state and how these responsibilities are to be discharged.

For example, it says: "Lo! Allah enjoins you to give trusts into the care of those who are worthy of trust and to judge with justice when you judge between the people" (4:58). The word "trusts" in the verse is to be understood in the same way as explained by the Prophet (PBUH) when some one asked him as to when the Day of Judgment will come.

The Prophet said "when people start violating trusts, you should wait for the Day of Judgment". What did that imply, the man further asked. The Prophet said, "it means when responsibilities are entrusted to those who are not worthy of it." (Bokhari)

Responsibilities referred to in this tradition imply the responsibilities of state which can be more appropriately equated with trusts. Likewise, when Hazrat Abu Dhar requested the Prophet for appointment to a public office the Prophet said, "Public office is a trust, a source of lamentation and remorse on the Day of Judgment except for him who takes it up with full sense of responsibility and duly discharges its obligations" (Muslim). It means responsibilities of the state are to be entrusted to those who are worthy of it which, according to the Quran, implies persons who are competent, honest and trustworthy (12:55).

From the above verse (4:58), it follows that the people should have a say in choosing the persons to whom the responsibilities of state are to be entrusted. This right was exercised in one way or the other in the elevation of first four Caliphs.

As regards discharge of responsibilities of state, guidance in this regard is provided in the Quranic verse which enjoined the Prophet to consult his companions in the conduct of affairs (3:159) and another verse which treats the persons who do their work through consultation as the persons being rightly guided (42:38).

Further indications in this regard are available in the address of Hazrat Abu Bakr which he delivered on the assumption of the office of first Caliph. He said, "0 people, now I am elevated as ruler over you, not the best among you. If I do good support me, if I err, then set me right.

To tell the truth to the person commissioned to rule is faithful allegiance; to conceal the truth and to lie is treason. In my sight, the powerful and weak are alike. By Allah, he that is weaker among you, shall be stronger, in my sight, until I have redressed his wrong; and he who is stronger, shall be weaker in my sight until he conforms to law and I have taken back from him that which he has usurped". (Ibne Ishaq).

The address, among other things, emphasizes the right of the people to correct the erring ruler through the freedom of expression and honest criticism. It also spells out one of the main responsibilities of the ruler of a Muslim state which should be protection of weak against the strong.

Thus, the Quran not only provides a clear pointer to the notion of a Muslim state but also guidance in terms of the people's right to have a say in choosing its rulers and correcting the erring rulers, the obligation of the rulers to conduct their affairs through consultation, the basic qualifications of the rulers and a broad-based charter of their duties and obligations.
__________________
"The race is not over because I haven't won yet."

Adil Memon
Police Service of Pakistan (P.S.P)
37th Common Training Program
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Adil Memon For This Useful Post:
umer shakeel (Saturday, October 10, 2015)
  #14  
Old Wednesday, August 24, 2005
Adil Memon's Avatar
37th Common
Medal of Appreciation: Awarded to appreciate member's contribution on forum. (Academic and professional achievements do not make you eligible for this medal) - Issue reason: CSP Medal: Awarded to those Members of the forum who are serving CSP Officers - Issue reason: CE 2008 - Merit 120
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Gujranwala
Posts: 1,025
Thanks: 334
Thanked 668 Times in 279 Posts
Adil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really nice
Default

Distorted image of Islam

By Jafar Wafa


AMERICAN historian Daniel Pipes, a known ‘neocon’ who has remained associated with President Bush’s administration, is reported to have said at a conference in Rome early this month that “the Islamists are the scions of frustrated civilization which harks back to the achievements of Islam during the first centuries of its existence.”

Another notable American Richard Nixon, the ex-president, has put it differently in his book (‘Seize the Moment’) that “Islam is not only a religion but founder of a major civilization.”

He had, evidently, in mind the contribution of Islam in civilizing mankind rather than merely prescribing rites and rituals, the historical aspect of the Faith — the aspect that has received scant attention by its pontifical class.

It is the uncompromising monotheism of Islam and the Quranic concept of the universal brotherhood of the believers in monotheism “the believers are no else than brothers” — 49:10), that has kept the Islamic civilization alive despite the political and economic domination by the West during the last three centuries.

The institution of Islamic caliphate was based on this very concept of Islamic brotherhood and it had bound together a sprawling commonwealth of Muslim sovereign states — albeit loosely and nominally during the two centuries of decadence preceding its decline. Its shadow fell on a vast area on the three well-populated and developed continents of Europe, Asia and Africa — the continents of America and Australia not being fully developed then.

All sovereign sultanates from Turkestan to Hindustan and Muslim monarchies from Morocco to Malaysia took pride in receiving investiture from the reigning caliph as it conferred religious legitimacy on their right to rule. It lasted for thirteen centuries, from the first quarter of the seventh to the first quarter of the twentieth, or from the election of the first Caliph in 632 A.D. till the abolition of the Caliphate by Ataturk in 1922 A.D. No other international political institution has proved so enduring.

Held together by a common faith and almost identical values and way of life this arrangement had, in its heyday, successfully scotched the narrow parochial tendencies and encouraged unfettered travel and unrestricted trade and offered freedom to the citizens to acquire domicile of any place in this commonwealth.

With decline in religious appeal, the institution could not survive for long; and this conglomeration of sovereign states was, one by one, taken over by the newly emerging colonial powers of western Europe and Russia, which professed Christianity while the disintegrated states of the Caliphate, occupied by the former, had been the stronghold of Islam.

This is the ‘frustrated civilization’ (in Daniel Pipe’s words) of which the present generation of Muslims are ‘scions’, or descendents of the civilization which has past achievements to its credit.

The instance of the dominant Christian powers of today, having extended their whole-hearted support to Israel and their complete unanimity in condoning the Jewish aggression, has brought home to the “Islamists” the truth of the Quranic edict that “they (the Jews and Christians) are friends among themselves (5:51).”

Otherwise, there was no reason for the members of the ‘frustrated civilization’ to stand, allegedly, pitted against the Christian West, after having reconciled themselves gradually, over a period of three centuries, to the domination of the Christian West with silent admiration for the latter’s astounding advancement in physical and biological sciences and peaceful introduction of democratic polity in its own habitat.

The fact, therefore, is that the ongoing conflict between the Palestinians and the Jewish settlers or the Kashmiris and the occupying foreign forces or the Chechens and savage Russian army and, likewise, freedom struggles of Muslim Moros in Philippines or Islamic resistance in southern Thailand are purely political in character bearing no similarity to the faith-based Crusades fought between Christian Europe and Muslim Arabs in the medieval era, which is a forgotten past so far as Muslims are concerned.

But the way America, the sole superpower, currently ruled by orthodox Christians and Jews is siding with the brutal and brutish ruling clique of Israel while the otherwise liberal and unorthodox European states are looking the other way, it is but natural that the Muslims all over the world who have, over the past centuries, considered themselves as one single fraternity, will react, very adversely, to this attitude of the Christian states and the Jews over the Palestinian issue which may actually be a political and tactical problem — the West, needing oil and gas more than others in the world, and the Middle East sitting over most of the precious liquid and vaporous mineral.

The propaganda by the American print media and think-tanks in the US, in the wake of 9/11, that Islam preaches religious intolerance and encourages militant tendencies among its adherents is reprehensible.

The greatest mischief having been done by those who claim to be authority on Islam. They refer to quranic verses such as the one that exhorted the small band of Muslims at the time of the ‘revelation’ to fight the infidels of Makkah in self-defence after they had suffered at their hands for fifteen long years. They tore from the context such verses as “fight them until persecution is no more and religion is for Allah” (2:193).

Unfortunately, our own clerics also share the blame for presenting a grossly distorted image of Islam as a religion that lays greater emphasis on Jihad, or militaristic struggle, than on peaceful, non-violent ways of seeking redress of the wrongs done to the Muslim community. Their notion stems from their approach to understanding the holy text treating every verse thereof as an injunction applicable in all circumstances without regard to the historical background and topical significance of each revelation. The Quranic translation and commentary in most of the languages does contain explanatory notes about the historical context of each revelation — Shan-i-nuzool’, as it is termed by our theologians in Urdu.
__________________
"The race is not over because I haven't won yet."

Adil Memon
Police Service of Pakistan (P.S.P)
37th Common Training Program
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Adil Memon For This Useful Post:
kcite (Friday, July 16, 2010), pisceankhan (Friday, August 08, 2014), umer shakeel (Saturday, October 10, 2015)
  #15  
Old Wednesday, August 24, 2005
Adil Memon's Avatar
37th Common
Medal of Appreciation: Awarded to appreciate member's contribution on forum. (Academic and professional achievements do not make you eligible for this medal) - Issue reason: CSP Medal: Awarded to those Members of the forum who are serving CSP Officers - Issue reason: CE 2008 - Merit 120
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Gujranwala
Posts: 1,025
Thanks: 334
Thanked 668 Times in 279 Posts
Adil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really nice
Default

Essence of accountability

By Haider Zaman



Among the entire creation of Allah, why have only the human beings been chosen for stringent accountability and appropriate requital on the Day of Judgment? The Holy Quran answers this question when it says, "We offered the trust to the heavens and the earth and the mountains, but they refused to bear it and were afraid of it, but man accepted it" (33:72).

It says again, "Had We sent this Quran upon a mountain, you would have seen it humble itself and cleave asunder for fear of Allah" (59:21). The word "trust" in the context of the first verse implies responsibilities of the office of Allah's vicegerent along with the guidance and resultant accountability. This is evident from the very object of the creation of human beings, which, according to the Quran, was to place them as Allah's vicegerents on earth (2:30).

As Allah's vicegerents they have to perform certain functions and discharge some responsibilities - in a nutshell, understanding, acting upon and implementing what Allah has ordained with the resultant accountability. This is what the word "worship" in the context of the verse (51:56) implies. These responsibilities, according to the verse (33:72), were offered to the heavens, the earth and the mountains but all of them refused to accept them. It was, however, the man who accepted them.

The next verse (59:21) says that if the Quran, which, inter alia, spells out the whole range of responsibilities of Allah's vicegerency and the necessary guidance for discharging them in a proper way, had been sent upon the mountains they would have shattered out of the fear of Allah. Such is the weight and awe of the burden of responsibilities of Allah's vicegerency and its accountability.

It is, however, not that Allah placed human beings as His vicegerents on earth, entrusting them with the responsibilities of the office and making them accountable for the same, without support. Allah has set a principle on which He acts, and it is that He never places such burden on them which they cannot bear (23:62). That's why Allah has provided them all that they need to facilitate the discharge of the responsibilities entrusted to them.

In the first instance, they have been created in the best possible form (95:4). Secondly, they have been endowed with all the faculties necessary for discharging their responsibilities as Allah's vicegerents. These faculties are: the ability to think, to reason, to hear, to feel, to see, to talk, to love, to be merciful and to make a distinction between right and wrong (16:78) (30:21) (91:8).

Thirdly, they have been provided necessary guidance, starting with Adam and ending with Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him) (20:123, 124) (76:3). Fourthly, whatever is on the earth and in the heavens has been subjected to them (31:20). Fifth, Allah has prescribed a common and the easiest possible way for seeking forgiveness for any deviations and the wrongs done by them, namely, sincere repentance (11:90). All these endowments have been summed up by the Quran thus "and conferred on them special favours above a greater part of Our creation" (17:70).

At the same time, human beings have been made accountable for the responsibilities entrusted to them. As the Quran says "Thus We shall most certainly call to account all those to whom We sent Our Messengers and shall also ask the Messengers" (7:6). It further says "but you shall certainly be called for your actions" (16:93).

The reason for such accountability is not the entrusting of responsibilities of the office of Allah's vicegerency alone or the favours bestowed, but also the free will (76:3) that human beings have along with their soul (91:7) and its three inclinations, namely, the inclination towards doing wrong and evil deeds (12:53), the inclination towards repentance and self-rapprochement for wrong done (75:2) and the inclination towards doing good and righteous deeds (89:27).

It is here that the question of accountability assumes special significance. Man has his own will, yet he is required to submit to the Will of Allah, i.e., to discharge his responsibilities as Allah's vicegerent in the manner ordained by Allah. He has been provided necessary guidance about the way he has to discharge his responsibilities, yet the soul (Nafs-i-Ammarah) impels him to deviate. Hence the need for accountability.

Thus, if human beings have been created to act as Allah's vicegerents on earth and endowed with all the faculties they need to discharge their responsibilities in a befitting manner and also provided the necessary guidance, it is only just and equitable that they have been made accountable to the responsibilities entrusted to them. In fact, the whole scheme of placing human beings as Allah's vicegerents on earth and guiding them to discharge their responsibilities as such would have been meaningless without accountability and the due process of requital.

Accountability will be on an individual basis and will take place on the Day of Judgment. As the Quran says "no bearer will bear the burden of another" (17:15). It further says "We have fastened the augury of every man to his neck, and on the Day of Judgment We shall bring forth a writing which he will find like an open book. (It will be said to him) Here is your record: read it. Today you yourself suffice as a reckoner against yourself" (17:13, 14).

About the requital, the Quran says "whoever adopts righteous ways, his righteous conduct will be for his own good, and whoever goes astray, his deviation will bring its consequences on himself" (17:15). It further says "but those who believe and do righteous deeds, He will give them their due rewards and more, out of His Bounty" (4:173). And "whoever does evil will be requited accordingly" (4:123).

Intercession will be possible but only by those who will be permitted by Allah. As the Quran says "who is there to intercede with Him except by His own permission" (2:255) and "no one can intercede in any manner except with His permission" (10:3). The Quran further says that "Shirk (disbelief in the unity of Allah) is the only sin that Allah does not forgive. He may forgive whosoever He will, other than this sin, for whoever associates a partner with Allah does, in fact, go far astray into deviation" (4:116). It means that all sins except disbelief in the unity of Allah are forgivable.

There can be three possible ways of forgiveness for the wrongs done. One is when a person sincerely repents in the life of this world. The other is through intercession subject to the conditions laid down in the above-mentioned verses. The third is when Allah Himself forgives some one.

According to a saying of the Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him), Allah divided mercy in a hundred parts. He kept 99 of these with Himself, most of which He will make use of on the Day of Judgment, and one part was sent down to earth to be distributed among human beings and all other living creatures (Muslim). Thus making use of His Mercy, Allah may forgive many of the wrong-doers except those who associated partners with Him.
__________________
"The race is not over because I haven't won yet."

Adil Memon
Police Service of Pakistan (P.S.P)
37th Common Training Program
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Adil Memon For This Useful Post:
umer shakeel (Saturday, October 10, 2015)
  #16  
Old Wednesday, August 24, 2005
Adil Memon's Avatar
37th Common
Medal of Appreciation: Awarded to appreciate member's contribution on forum. (Academic and professional achievements do not make you eligible for this medal) - Issue reason: CSP Medal: Awarded to those Members of the forum who are serving CSP Officers - Issue reason: CE 2008 - Merit 120
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Gujranwala
Posts: 1,025
Thanks: 334
Thanked 668 Times in 279 Posts
Adil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really nice
Default

Essence of Eidul Fitr


By Jauhar Ali



Gratefulness to God is always rewarded. Eidul Fitr is a reward to the Muslim ummah for striving to temper their souls through the rigours of self-denial and offering of special prayers during the holy month of Ramazan in humble thankfulness and sincere gratitude for the countless mercies, blessings and favours of our Creator which we enjoy in our mundane life.

God has created man as the best of all His creations and exalted him to the noble and dignified position of being His deputy on earth. In His infinite kindness and mercy He loves His subjects more than parents love their offsprings. It is only proper, therefore, that man as Allah's vicegerent on earth bases the lofty mission of his life on the worship and thankfulness to God for His endless bounties, grace and favours bestowed on him right from his cradle to the grave.

According to the Holy Quran Allah says, "I have created only jinn and man, that they may serve and worship Me." (Quran, 51:56). On another occasion Allah addresses man in these words: "It is He who brought you forth from the wombs of your mothers when you knew nothing; and He gave you hearing and sight and intelligence and love, that you may give thanks to Him" (Quran, 16:78).

The above verses indicate that the entire community of human beings is enjoined and obligated to worship God and to be thankful to Him. Thankfulness is one of the four qualities essential for perfection of belief in Islam. The other three being truthfulness, modesty and good behaviour. Eidul Fitr, observed after the end of the month of Ramazan, on the first of lunar month Shawwal every year, is a day of rejoicing and thanksgiving to the Lord of the universe for giving the strength for having successfully fulfilled the test of faith Divinely ordained.

Beyond feasting and festivities, Eidul Fitr is also an ibadah (worship). Ibadah is the most vital duty of man towards his Maker and includes all actions which are performed in obedience to and for the pleasure of Allah. The concept of ibadah (worship) in Islam is all too comprehensive and encompasses the whole spectrum of human conduct covering both fulfilling obligations to Allah (Huquq-al-Ibad) and obligations towards fellow-beings (Huquq-al'Ibad). Fulfilment of both Huquq Allah and Huquq-al-'Ibad must be integrated to attain success as true adherents of Allah.

The Lord of the universe did not leave man unguided in treading on to the path leading to the attainment of the lofty mission of his life. The world is a place of trial and man is to be judged on the basis of the life he lives in it. Everything in the world is for man but man himself is for his Lord and his mission in life is to fulfil the will of God. For his guidance, Allah raised many Messengers from amongst the descendants of Adam with Hazrat Muhammad (PBUH) embodying the finality of prophethood and Islam marking the perfection of Divine commandments.

Fundamentally all the Prophets of God based their teachings on the concept of ibadah which helps to develop a close relationship between an individual and his Lord. All good deeds are included in ibadah and consistent observance of ibadah creates taqwa (Godliness) which consists of complete submission to the will of God. The Prophets of God succeeded in making people observe their duty to God and to their fellow beings through the force of taqwa.

Taqwa is the vital driving force in developing the inner strength of man. The Prophets of God tried to nourish and nurture the quality of taqwa among human beings through various forms of ibadah and through emphasis on their social obligations.

However, worship on its own is not enough; it must be accompanied by good deeds denoting complete submission to the will and pleasure of Allah. Through acts of devotion one fulfils obligations to Allah and through good deeds to men one fulfils his obligations towards his fellow beings.

Those who are included in the ummah of the Holy Prophet Hazrat Muhammad (Peace be upon him) have been enjoined among other ibadah, to say prayers five times every day. It has also been made obligatory for Muslims to observe fast during the holy month of Ramazan for it would make them muttaqi (righteous). Quran says: "O you who believe! Fasting is prescribed for you as it was prescribed for those before you, that you may attain taqwa" (Qur'an 2: 183). "It is not the meat nor the blood that reaches Allah! It is taqwa that reaches Him" (Qur'an 22:37). The taqwa is an integral part of the doctrine of Islam and should, therefore, be attained by every Muslim.

As a practical and practicable religion Islam has provided a complete code of life for Muslims and all those who care to follow the teachings of Islam through Divine guidance in the shape of Holy Quran and the Sunnah of the Prophet (PBUH). Herein lies the well-being of man both in this temporal and eternal life. Blessed are those who are fortunate to be included in the ummah of the Holy Prophet (PBUH) as beneficiaries of all His kindness and eternal blessings.

As an act of worship (ibadah), fasting in Ramazan aims at promoting taqwa and realization of the real value of deprivation of a thing and inculcating a keener sense of appreciation and gratitude for it. This is the real significance of Eidul Fitr. While celebrating Eid, we must remember the plight of the less privileged, the discarded, the deprived, the homeless and the destitute who find themselves in trying circumstances in different parts of the world. Our hearts must go out to them. Without this we will be wanting in the real spirit of Eid.
__________________
"The race is not over because I haven't won yet."

Adil Memon
Police Service of Pakistan (P.S.P)
37th Common Training Program
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Adil Memon For This Useful Post:
pisceankhan (Friday, August 08, 2014), umer shakeel (Saturday, October 10, 2015)
  #17  
Old Wednesday, August 24, 2005
Adil Memon's Avatar
37th Common
Medal of Appreciation: Awarded to appreciate member's contribution on forum. (Academic and professional achievements do not make you eligible for this medal) - Issue reason: CSP Medal: Awarded to those Members of the forum who are serving CSP Officers - Issue reason: CE 2008 - Merit 120
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Gujranwala
Posts: 1,025
Thanks: 334
Thanked 668 Times in 279 Posts
Adil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really nice
Default

Essence of Islamic polity

By Jafar Wafa



As the Quran is not a textbook of political science, one should not expect it to contain systematic chapters on each aspect of an Islamic government. Its primary concern in the realm of politics is not the form of government, but as explicitly expressed in chapter three verse 110, the function of an Islamic government - "to enforce values recognized as good (maroof) and forbid those which are abhorrent (munkar)."

While it does not prescribe the details of a specific kind of government and avoids laying down a rigid framework of polity, it would be a folly to suppose that it does not provide sufficient indicators regarding the system of government.

A government which is really competent to interpret maroof in the contemporary situation and enforce it, and, similarly, identify munkar and forbid it, must meet four requirements set out in the Quran, not serially, but in different contexts.

First and foremost, it demands that it should be a government enjoying people's confidence and respect - not an arbitrary, arrogant dictator's rule. The Holy Prophet (peace be upon him) was addressed by the Almighty thus: "We have not sent you as a warder over them." (4:80).

The Almighty meant these words and His Apostle, while founding the first Islamic state after the conquest of Makkah, acted upon them. It was his humility and humbleness as a conqueror and magnanimity and generosity as a wielder of authority that won the hearts of those who were Islam's sworn enemies, and, in the words of Abdur Rahman Azzam, "the tribes went over to Islam en masse in the span of one day and night". (The Eternal Message of Muhammad)

The year after Makkah fell, in one hour's engagement on one day with hardly a dozen deaths, is called the 'year of deputations' as deputations swarmed from all parts of Arabia to swear allegiance to the new state of Madinah only because the person who was at the helm, though in fact the 'emperor' of Arabia, lived as simple a life as the poorest among the tribes.

The head of the first Islamic state was widely different in dress and demeanour, in diet and dwelling and in daily routine from the bejewelled, bedecked crowned kings and potentates of contemporary Byzantine and Persian empires. The first four Caliphs who succeeded him as head of state followed in his footsteps as faithfully as was possible.

The edifice of modern western political and social systems, it must be underlined, was built not on the ashes of the long-lasting, widespread Roman empire, the pride of all Europe, but on the foundation laid in an oasis of Arabia in 630 A.D. (or 8 A.H.).

The Second requirement according to the Quran, is "administration by mutual consultation" (42:38). In other words, no one, even a pious and popular ruler should rule without "consultation."

The Prophet was advised by the Almighty "to consult them (the Companions) in appropriate matters" (3:159). This obligation to consult, cuts at the roots of despotic and autocratic rule and demands the setting up of a consultative organ.

It is generally thought that kings and queens are not in sync with the modern concept of democracy. But democracies in Europe have allowed kings and queens to remain as heads of state.

Even the so-called 'mother of parliaments' is quite comfortable with the reigning Queen Elizabeth II. But all these hereditary monarchs are no longer arbitrary rulers, because they have to go by what the elected cabinet of ministers and consultative body decides.

The Quran accords legitimacy to the kingship of Hazrat Daud and his son Hazrat Sulaiman (Biblical David and Solomon) as they were divinely-guided benevolent rulers.

The Quran also speaks well of Queen of Sheba who always acted on her chieftains' "considered advice and decided no case unless they consulted her" (27:32). In short, an ideal government should run the affairs of the state by installing a suitable system of 'mutual consultation.'

The third requirement, in the light of Quranic indicators, for a government to be able to encourage good values and discourage bad ones is that the constitution of the state should recognize that the supreme sovereignty belongs to Allah and not to a 'mortal God', as invented by Hobbes, or the 'general will', in Rousseau's terminology, or the 'proletariat dictatorship' in Marx's parlance, or the 'majority party' in modern democracies.

In a truly Islamic dispensation, the majority party cannot legislate anything that is repugnant to Islamic tenets and teachings. Thus, the majority will is not sacrosanct, as in other democracies, at least in the sphere of law-making.

The Quranic verdict on this issue is unequivocal: "If you act on the advice of most of those on earth, they would mislead you from Allah's path, as they follow nothing but an opinion and indulge in conjectures" (6:116). This necessitates screening of all laws by a body like the Islamic Ideology Council in Pakistan and the Council of Clerics in Iran to act as moral 'guardians.'

The fourth requirement pertains to the 'quality' of politicians seeking election as members of the legislative organs. According to the Quran, it is only the "noblest" among the community of voters who deserve to be elected and "the noblest persons, in the sight of Allah, are the best in conduct, or the most pious, according to another translation" (49:13). Thus, the most deserving candidate should not be the most powerful or a known populist seeking popularity among the masses for personal fame.

It was, perhaps, in elucidation of this Quranic edict that the Holy Prophet is reported to have observed that "an Ethiopian slave (of his time) with right deeds to his credit has a greater claim to be the ruler than a wrongdoer from the nobility of Quraish."

As one may have noted these requirements do not suggest that an Islamic state should be a theocracy. On the contrary, the scale is in favour of a non-secular democracy.

Non secular because, firstly, unlike in a secular democracy, the sovereignty here belongs to Allah and not to the will of the majority of citizens of the state and, secondly, because all proposed laws have to be subjected to scrutiny and approval by an appropriate Islamic council before they become the law of the land.
__________________
"The race is not over because I haven't won yet."

Adil Memon
Police Service of Pakistan (P.S.P)
37th Common Training Program
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Adil Memon For This Useful Post:
umer shakeel (Saturday, October 10, 2015)
  #18  
Old Wednesday, August 24, 2005
Adil Memon's Avatar
37th Common
Medal of Appreciation: Awarded to appreciate member's contribution on forum. (Academic and professional achievements do not make you eligible for this medal) - Issue reason: CSP Medal: Awarded to those Members of the forum who are serving CSP Officers - Issue reason: CE 2008 - Merit 120
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Gujranwala
Posts: 1,025
Thanks: 334
Thanked 668 Times in 279 Posts
Adil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really nice
Default

Eternal message & guidance

By Shahjahan Akhtar


THE Muslim Ummah is in disarray. We Muslims are to be blamed for the present state of affairs. The main cause of this can be attributed to the fact that Muslims generally recite the Holy Quran like a parrot, without understanding it and do not follow what is ordained in it.

The Quran is a unique book, with eternal message and universal relevance. It contains the foundation of an entire system of life, from specific articles of faith and commandments to general moral teachings, rights and obligations, crime and punishment, personal and public law and a number of private and social concerns. These issues are described in a variety of ways, such as direct stipulations, reminders of Allah’s favours on His creation, admonitions and rebukes. Stories of past communities are narrated, followed by the lessons to be learned from their actions and subsequent fates.

Thus, it becomes incumbent on all those who call themselves Muslim, to recite the Quran regularly, understand it and follow what is ordained therein.

The Holy Quran, with 114 suras, of which 86 were revealed in Makkah over a period of 13 years and 28 in Madinah during the next 10 years, containing 666 verses and forming 30 chapters, was revealed over a period of 23 Lunar years on Prophet Muhammad (PBUH).

Let us see what Allah tells about the Holy Quran. Allah takes responsibility to teach Quran to the Prophet. “By degrees shall we teach thee (the message), so thou shalt not forget, except as Allah wills; for he knoweth what is manifest and what is hidden. And we shall make it easy for thee (to follow) the simple path.” (87:608).

Allah tells the Holy Prophet “thus have we sent this down — an Arabic Quran — and explained in detail some of the warnings.... be not in haste with the Quran before its revelation to thee is completed.” (20:113-114).

In Sura 75: 16-19, Allah asks the Prophet “Move not thy tongue concerning the Quran to make haste therewith. It is for US to collect it and recite it..... it is for US to explain it (the make it clear.)

“So have we made the Quran easy in thine own tongue, that with it thou mayest give glad tidings to the righteous, and warnings to people given to contention. (19:97).

Quran is divided into parts by Allah thus: “It is a Quran which We have divided (into parts from time to time), in order that thou mightest recite it to people at intervals: We have revealed it by stages. (17:106)

Allah made the Quran clear and easy to understand “These are the Ayats of Revelations, of a Quran that makes things clear. (15:1) These are verses of the Book, that makes things clear. (26:2, and the same repeated in 27:1, 28:2, 43:2). “By the Book that makes things clear; we have made it a Quran in Arabic, that ye may be able to understand.” (43:3)

“Had We sent this as a Quran (in a language) other than Arabic, they would have said: ‘Why are not its verses explained in detail? What! a foreign (tongue) and a Messenger an Arab?’ Say, it is a guide and a healing to those who believe; and for those who believe not, there is a deafness in their ears, and it is blindness (in their eyes): they are (as it were) being called from a place far distant.” (41:44)

There is no twist crookedness in the Quran: “Praise to be Allah, Who hath sent to His servants the Book, and hath allowed therein no crookedness. He hath made it straight and clear .... (18:1-2)

Two types of verses are in Quran: “He it is Who has sent down to thee the Book: In it are verses, ‘Muhakamat’— basic or fundamental, clear (in meaning), they are the foundation of the Book. Others - ‘Mutashabayat’ — not entirely clear. But those in whose hearts is perversity follow the part thereof that is not entirely clear (‘Mutashabayat’); Seeking discord, and searching for its interpretation, but no one knows its true meaning except Allah. (3:7)

The way to study/recite the Holy Quran: “Those to whom we have given the book study it as it should be studied.” (2:121) “And recite the Quran in low measured rhythmic tones.” (73:4) “Read ye, as much of the Quran, as may be easy (for you).” (73:20)

The best time to recite the Quran is this directed: And the recital of Quran at ‘fajr’ (early morning) is ‘mashood’ (witnessed). (17:78)

It is (Quran) for all the worlds and all times. “Verily, this is not less than a message to all the worlds.” (81:27)

The Quran is preserved and guarded by Allah: “We have without doubt, sent down the Message; And We will assuredly guard it. (15:9) “Nay, this is a glorious Quran, (inscribed) in tablet preserved.” (85:21-22)

From the above ayats, it can be summarised that:

The Quran, in the form we have for the last over 1400 years, was finally compiled as per instructions received from Allah, and it is preserved in a tablet with Him.

Allah tells in the Quran that it is clear and straight to understand.

The Quran has withstood the test of time. Since its revelation efforts have been made by non-believers to mock it, corrupt it, destroy it, give different meanings to ayats but the Quran has remained unchanged over the last 14 centuries in its present form.

Recitation of the Quran in the language it was revealed is also an act of worship. But its meaning must be understood in the language one knows and obey the commandments contained therein implicitly. On the last day of judgment everybody will be judged according to ones’ deeds.

And Allah tells: “This is the Book (the Quran), in it is guidance sure, without doubt, to those, who fear Allah, who believe in unseen, are steadfast in prayer, and spend out what We have provided for them; And who believe in Revelation, sent to thee and sent before thy time and in their hearts have the assurance of Hereafter”. And Allah promises, that, “They are on true guidance from their Lord and it is these who will prosper”. (2:1-5)

Thus, the Quran is not a Book to be kept, wrapped in velvety covers, in upper most hard to reach shelves ‘or only to be used for keeping on the head of a bride when departing after ‘nikah’ for her new home.

May Allah show us “the straight way, the way of those on whom He has bestowed His grace, those whose portion is not wrath, and who did not go astray”.Amen
__________________
"The race is not over because I haven't won yet."

Adil Memon
Police Service of Pakistan (P.S.P)
37th Common Training Program
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Adil Memon For This Useful Post:
pisceankhan (Friday, August 08, 2014), umer shakeel (Saturday, October 10, 2015), waleedbaig (Sunday, January 06, 2013)
  #19  
Old Wednesday, August 24, 2005
Adil Memon's Avatar
37th Common
Medal of Appreciation: Awarded to appreciate member's contribution on forum. (Academic and professional achievements do not make you eligible for this medal) - Issue reason: CSP Medal: Awarded to those Members of the forum who are serving CSP Officers - Issue reason: CE 2008 - Merit 120
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Gujranwala
Posts: 1,025
Thanks: 334
Thanked 668 Times in 279 Posts
Adil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really nice
Default

First egalitarian creed

By Jafar Wafa


ISLAM, unlike some superstitious religions, introduced egalitarian creeds focussing on the uplift of society by ameliorating the lot of the slaves, the orphans and the poor as a first step to the ennoblement of human life.

God’s worship (Salat) for reward in after-life was emphasized in tandem with spending for noble causes (Zakat) to alleviate poverty and mitigate economic distress faced by the marginalized sections of society where traditions of authority and hierarchy under a tribal system prevailed and no thought was given to emancipating the down-trodden.

The very first chapter of the Holy Quran Surah Al-Baqra which follows the short, seven-verse “opening” Surah — enumerates the categories of those pious persons who can receive guidance from the Book and includes those “who spend from what has been bestowed upon them.”

To spend does not mean only paying the obligatory Zakat, as has generally been interpreted by most of the exegessists (mufassirin). Just as the verse in question does not specify the term ‘what has been bestowed upon them’ — agricultural land, urban property, jewellery, or cash — likewise the Ayat does not particularize how and how much out of the belongings of a person have to be spent on ‘Khair’, or good causes.

It is in chapter 70 that the Quran depicts the fate of those who, in their life-time, sat on piles of wealth but did not spend it for their own benefit or for the good of society contrasting them with others who were not only mindful of prayers but also of spending their money for charitable purposes. It says that those who deserve a place in hell will be the ones “who hoarded wealth and withheld it” unlike their generous counterparts who will dwell in ‘honoured gardens’ as they were not only constant in their worship but also realized that in their wealth there was an ‘acknowledged right for the beggar and the destitute’ (Ayat 15- 25).

The Quran exhorts the believers, repeatedly, to spend (Anfaque) and give (Eeta): “Spend out of what has been provided to you before death comes to you” (63:11). Spend not for ostentatious consumerism or for flaunting wealth, as no sane person will give such an advice, let alone a religious scripture. Spending has been defined in the Quran as the opposite of hoarding. One of the worst persons in the sight of Allah is that “who has amassed wealth and arranged it, (after counting the coins and currency notes) thinking that his wealth will render him immortal” (104:2-3).

Such are the persons “who do not respect the orphan, nor urge on the feeding of the poor, devour heritages with devouring greed and love money with abounding love” (89:17-20). Another pen- picture of the hoarder who is loath to spend money or even give some one articles of paltry worth: “Although he wants to be seen praying yet he refuses even small kindnesses” (almaoon).

Nothing has been left to imagination. So complete is the description of those who give and spend that if one were to make a list of the relevant verses of the Quran on this subject, the effort will result in compilation of a book containing explanatory notes and contextual information regarding each revelation. That book will begin with a categorical declaration of the Almighty: “you will not attain unto piety until you spend out of that which you love and covet most” (3:92).

Who are such persons who take heed of this Divine statement and do all in their power to be counted as pious men and women, not by the multitude of men and women on earth, but by the almighty himself? They are the ones “who spend in ease and in diversity” (3.134). That is, not only when they have plenty of money to spare for charity (although it is commendable indeed) but also when they are in financial straits and find it difficult to meet their own and their family’s dire needs. The reward from the Lord is beyond imagination.

Then comes another description of such generosity: “They spend secretly and openly” (13:22). No harm in making public your donations to charitable or poverty-alleviation projects. That might induce others to donate generously. But even generosity should follow the age-old principle of ‘golden mean’, its modern version may be ‘enlightened moderation’. The Divine endorsement of this principle comes in these words:” When they spend, they are neither prodigal nor grudging but take a firm position between the two extremes” (25:67). This is, obviously, to check excess and disproportion, in this case too as in all cases, to bring about harmony between extremes of stinginess and prodigality.

The Quran asks the reader to imagine that he, or she, is standing in a valley (Aqaba) or a gorge in a mountainous terrain and to get out of it and climb up to the summit is a forbidding task. The suggested course to “ascend is to free a slave, to feed the hungry — maybe an orphan or near of kin or some poor wretch in misery” (90:12 16).

Those who heard these inspired verses from the Holy Prophet (Peace be upon him) developed a soft corner for the slaves particularly and the poor folk generally. His close and respected companion, Hazrat Abu Zar Ghaffari, was so moved by these verses that he inclined towards Islam’s ‘socialistic’ programme and led an austere life and shunned the sight of affluence and ostentation displayed by the privileged minority contrasted with poverty and penury of the majority.

He retired into the privacy of his modest home. When he went to Syria after its conquest in Caliph Umar’s time, he could not stay there because he could not reconcile his understanding of Islam with the luxurious life in Roman fashion. Not that he was alone to feel that way. The reigning Caliph himself is reported to have uttered the famous words that he as a ruler would be accountable to Allah if even a stray dog died of hunger on the bank of a Mesopotamian river.

Even those who did not hear the Quranic verses from the holy Prophet himself but have read the inspired text in the printed copies of the Holy Book are moved like the revered Companions of the Prophet. Maulana Hasrat Mohani is one such person of our times — a devout Muslim, praying and fasting and leading an austere life.

A word of caution here. Socialism should not be confused with atheistic Marxism, which Allama Iqbal called, derisively, as ‘musawaat-i-shikam’ or equality of stomachs in Javed Nama. The fact is that in today’s environment, no one will tolerate compulsory, regimented equality. The collapse of

the Soviet system is the proof, if a proof is needed.

It may be appropriate to quote Plato’s remarkably valid remark appearing in his seminal work, The Republic, that “every form of government tends to perish by an excess of its basic principle.” So, let us alleviate poverty in our country through citizens’ combined effort, as the Quran visualises — every moneyed person contributing money, muscle and mind “to ascend the summit.” It need not be left to the government alone.
__________________
"The race is not over because I haven't won yet."

Adil Memon
Police Service of Pakistan (P.S.P)
37th Common Training Program
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Adil Memon For This Useful Post:
umer shakeel (Saturday, October 10, 2015)
  #20  
Old Wednesday, August 24, 2005
Adil Memon's Avatar
37th Common
Medal of Appreciation: Awarded to appreciate member's contribution on forum. (Academic and professional achievements do not make you eligible for this medal) - Issue reason: CSP Medal: Awarded to those Members of the forum who are serving CSP Officers - Issue reason: CE 2008 - Merit 120
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Gujranwala
Posts: 1,025
Thanks: 334
Thanked 668 Times in 279 Posts
Adil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really niceAdil Memon is just really nice
Default

'Fundamentalism' twisted

By S.G. Jilanee


Few epithets in the English language have been more abused, perhaps, than fundamentalism (and fundamentalist). Today the term is applied to disparage the orthodox followers of other faiths, especially, Muslims. But this is an arbitrary and biased view, which calls for a closer look.

It is well established that the root and essence of all faiths is the same. All have the same virtues: truth, peace, forgiveness, love, charity et al as their core precepts. And all forbid the same vices. For instance, Hindus are commanded to practise ahinsa (non-violence), shanti (peace) and satya (truth). The code of "Ahinsa pranwu dharmah," means "non-violence is the highest article of piety (faith)." In fact Ahinsa, basically includes also rejecting ill-will, envy, covetousness and doing any harm by word, deed or thought to anyone. Besides, Hindu scriptures prescribe the three Ds," - Datta, Dayadhavam, Damyata: "Datta," to give alms,; "Dayadhvam," to have compassion; "Damyata," to practise self-control.

The Zarathushti creed prescribes Humata, Hukhta and Havarastra (Good Thoughts, Good Words and Good Deeds). The principal and cardinal virtue for the followers of Zarathushtra is to adhere to these principles.

The "Ten Perfections" (paramis) of Buddhism comprise Generosity (dana), Morality (sila), Renunciation (nekkhamma), Wisdom (panna), Energy (viriya), Patience (khanti), Truthfulness (sacca), Resolution (adhitthana), Loving-Kindness (metta), and Equanimity (upekkha).

Christianity defines pride, envy, gluttony, lust, anger, greed and sloth as the "Seven Deadly Sins." It emphasizes giving alms, humility and meekness. The Ten Commandments include such injunctions as "Honour thy father and thy mother. Thou shalt not kill. Thou shalt not commit adultery. Thou shalt not steal. Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour. Thou shall not covet."

As well they enjoin the observance of Sabbath, forbid taking the name of God in vain, worshipping other gods, and idolatry. As for Islam, because it is the latest and last revealed religion, it not only incorporates what was revealed before but revises and improves upon it. It goes into greater detail and more specifically prescribes and prohibits, advises and cautions, instructs and admonishes, on how a Muslim should conduct his quotidian affairs. It even advises on personal deportment and etiquette, such as, "speak fair to people" (2:83).

"Swell not thy cheek (with pride) at men, nor walk in insolence through the earth; be moderate in thy pace and lower thy voice (speak softly), for the harshest of sounds without a doubt is the braying of the ass" (17: 37-38).

Likewise, in regard to charity, it goes so far as to advise on what to give, whom to give it to and how. The righteous are defined as "Those who spend (in the cause of Allah), whether in prosperity or in adversity; who restrain anger, and pardon (all) people" (3:134). They are promised forgiveness and the reward of Paradise.

The Quran repeatedly emphasizes the sanctity of human life, fulfilling promises and resolving disputes. As to truth, it is forbidden even to dilute it with falsehood. The numerous injunctions in the Quran are further supplemented by a mass of Traditions (Hadith and Sunnah) of the Prophet (S.A.W.) which show how he translated those precepts in word and deed.

Thus, there is nothing offensive about fundamentalism, per se. No religion preaches attacking others' beliefs. For instance, both Christianity and Islam forbid idolatry, but that is all. Islam specifically forbids insulting other people's gods and wherever it mentions idols, all it says is that they have no powers.

Even in its extremist form, strict adherence to one's creed would be quite inoffensive. A Hindu or Christian hermit may dwell in a cave, a monastery or under a tree and there do the most rigorous penance in a state of extreme self-denial. A Muslim similarly, may renounce the world like Abu bin Adhem, give himself to fasting and prayer and so forth.

How can such people hurt others' religious feelings? Essentially, therefore, fundamentalists should be the most harmless people. Doing their own thing, they would be like groups of mountaineers, each one of them trying to scale the peak from a different side, without interfering with others. Or like athletes running a race where each one keeps to his track, so they do not collide. Fundamentalism practised sincerely could, therefore, be the best guarantee for world peace.

The reason fundamentalism is widely denounced is that it is confused with fanaticism. It is actually fanaticism that is the real culprit. It is the negation of fundamentalism, because it aggressively encroaches upon others' beliefs. It fuels hatred, stokes conflict and encourages violence. There are many fanatics who berate each other's religion and incite their followers to violence against each other. It is fanatics that destroy mosques, burn churches, bomb synagogues and roast missionaries alive. Not fundamentalists.

Distinction, therefore, should be made between fundamentalism and fanaticism and the latter should be unequivocally condemned and forcibly curbed.Another fallacy is to regard liberalism as a counterpoint to "fundamentalism."

But liberalism is itself the fanatical form of secularism. It aims to turn every old value on its head with a vengeance. Some interpretations of this give an approving nod to gay marriages, support single motherhood, condone killing of unwanted fetus, wink at couples cohabiting without wedlock, et al, ad infini-tum. Its fanatical side reveals itself in attacks on fundamentalists with such names as "fundos."

To counter fundamentalism, another term has since gained wide currency in the western lexicon. This is "moderation." Moderates are supposed to include people, who do not take their religion too strictly. They are projected as the opposite of extremists, to make it sound innocuous and satisfy those who would frown at naked liberalism. But actually, it aims to proselytize fundamentalist Muslims unwittingly to liberalism, by luring them to relinquish their grip of the "rope of Allah" (habl illah), and openly defy the dictates of their religion.

Wilful deviation, would, however, be extremely risque, because vice is addictive. Once there is a fall, one may go down till he hits the very bottom of perdition. Therefore, Islam is very clear on this point. It has no place for fence-sitters. "Enter into Islam wholeheartedly," is the Quran's clarion call (2:208).

Moreover, true moderation (balance and flexibility) is inbuilt in all religions. Islam takes special cognizance of human problems. It has prescribed certain parameters which are inflexible. Within those parameters it allows ample scope for the exercise of free will, including matters such as prayers and Ramazan fasting or even eating food that is otherwise strictly forbidden. Even transgressions, except wilful defiance of Allah, are forgivable, provided the sinner contritely repents.

Three ineluctable conclusions flow from the above discussions: one, that fundamentalism is acutely misunderstood. True fundamentalism is totally harmless. Two; that fanaticism is the source of all trouble. Three; that in Islam there is nothing like moderation.
__________________
"The race is not over because I haven't won yet."

Adil Memon
Police Service of Pakistan (P.S.P)
37th Common Training Program
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Adil Memon For This Useful Post:
Aqazaansari (Tuesday, July 07, 2015), umer shakeel (Saturday, October 10, 2015), wajid ali khan (Friday, February 05, 2010)
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
development of pakistan press since 1947 Janeeta Journalism & Mass Communication 14 Wednesday, November 11, 2015 11:03 AM
Friday prayers Hurriah Islam 1 Monday, November 05, 2007 05:54 PM
Sahih_Bukhari hellowahab Islam 39 Wednesday, September 26, 2007 09:59 AM
Friday Dawn - The farewell sermon Desert Fox Islamiat Notes 0 Friday, December 22, 2006 09:59 AM
indo-pak relations atifch Current Affairs 0 Monday, December 11, 2006 08:01 PM


CSS Forum on Facebook Follow CSS Forum on Twitter

Disclaimer: All messages made available as part of this discussion group (including any bulletin boards and chat rooms) and any opinions, advice, statements or other information contained in any messages posted or transmitted by any third party are the responsibility of the author of that message and not of CSSForum.com.pk (unless CSSForum.com.pk is specifically identified as the author of the message). The fact that a particular message is posted on or transmitted using this web site does not mean that CSSForum has endorsed that message in any way or verified the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any message. We encourage visitors to the forum to report any objectionable message in site feedback. This forum is not monitored 24/7.

Sponsors: ArgusVision   vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.