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Old Sunday, August 19, 2007
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Default Does Islam Authorize Co-Education System?

Is Islam Authorize of Co Education?
Co Educayion mean the education of boys & girls in the same institutions. It was not common till some decades ago but now it has become very popular all our the world.This a modren concept, which is being introduced in the countries where it never used to be. Asian countries are also tending to adopt this modren system of education. In Pakistan different people have different opinion about the system of Co Education.
what you say about the system of Co Education?

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I don't know why we people always like to share conservative ideas on any islamic topic. The world is changing day by day but still we practice what have been practiced centuries ago. Our Islam is based on the principles that work efficiently within any period of time. But Islam also allow us to change our trends time by time. If we go through muslim history, we will find that muslims used the traditional weapons like sword and horses. All these were also use by our Holy Prophet, and thus became sunnah for us. My question if for all Muslim Conservatives that why SUCH SUNNAH ARE NOT PRACTICED NOWADAYS AND WHY WE USE GUNS AND FLIEGHTS?
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First of all lets hail Haroon-ur-Rushid who abolished the institution of Ijtihad from Islamic legislation, or it would have flourished and we would have no ambiguities today as this one..

Anarkali its a very important question though unanswered authentically.. What ever I’ll or any body else will say as opinion will have no much effect apart of logical point.

Now I do think f Muslim women were allowed in the times of
Muhammad (S.A.W) rather were encouraged to have bajamat prayers.. I don’t find a reason to negate this concept..
Note women’s bajamat prayer was prohibited in the times of OMER (R.A)

Similarly a question here raises leave Pakistan what if a nuclear scientist is to have a research for the sake of Islam/Country from any prestigious institute of the world (which are all co) will Islam prohibit him or will encourage him?
The answer of this question can be achieved keeping in mind the two ahadis I am gona quote..

MAFUH-E-AHADIS
"ILAM HASIL KARO CHAYEE US K LIYAE TUMHIEN CHINA HI JANA PARAE"


"AUR TYAR RAKHU APNIE GHURAE TAKAE HAEBAT TARI HUJAE TUMHARAE DUSMANUU PAE"
Well see if today one wants to keep a pace in tech and defense at least you cant only rely on our own institutes u may have to go out for better training..

i think there is a strong need of institution of ijthad to guide the nation through these sort of problems
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@Anarkali
you mean if we see world is changing day by day then why women do veil but now world is change now it is a modren era why we pray namaz & any good thing why we are Listening music only the cause world is change.
Music not allowed in islam.
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Lightbulb Basic Questions

AOA dear forum members !!!!!

@ All respected members
To answer the post started by sister, let's pose the question the other way.

Tell me a single VALID reason why MALE & FEMALE cannot study seperately?

Wo kon si study hai jo co-education mein hee possible hai?

NOTE:
to-the-point answers will be appreciated.

@maiji
Can you please tell us the definition of "CONSERVATIVE MUSLIMS"?

@marshal453
Code:
 
What ever I’ll or any body else will say as opinion will have no much effect apart of logical point.
Brother, whatever will be said in the thread will be Inshallah from Quran & Sunnah only. Rest assure.
Lets answer the question posted above first and see where this thread goes.
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@strains
I think i gave u the answer in my post....
"AUR TYAR RAKHU APNIE GHURAE TAKAE HAEBAT TARI HUJAE TUMHARAE DUSMANUU PAE"
Well see if today one wants to keep a pace in tech and defense at least you cant only rely on our own institutes u may have to go out (foreign institutes) for better training and studies or shall v wait till our own institutes become good enough?
more over my dear friend quoting ayah and ahadis isn't enough u need Fatwa for that as just quotation of Ayah and Ahadis is not valid until you don’t know its
shan-e-nazuul......
This is just like in many ayah i quote
"aur maat parhuu namaz...."continues" jab tum napaki ki halat mien hu"
Now look people may start quoting the first part only but how abt its
shan-e-nazuul?
I.e. subject of matter in what particular sense this ayah come for.. if any body denies that! I’ll give further explanation
@anarkali
i gave u the reason i did not say women should not use veil.. Co education doesn't mean start having western dresses on! we see many girls in co edu who are in full nakab what to say abt them they don't do anything point able..

And here guys and girls i'll qoute
"barish maati aur Kachrae duno pae barasti hai.. Right?
maati pae baras k kushbu dati hai aur kachrae pae baras k badbuu..
Now wil you start saying barish gandgi pae barasnie sae rukhni chyae..!
There are some draw backs too but that’s just as this example I quoted above...
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Lightbulb FATWA & Shan-e-nazul

AOA dear forum members !!!!!

@marshal453

A)
We will definitely discuss this issue on international level also. But lets stick to our own country first. Keeping in view the current condition of CO-EDUCATION in our country, my question is still same;

1. Tell me a single VALID reason why MALE & FEMALE cannot study seperately?
Wo kon si study hai jo co-education mein hee possible hai?

To add another question;

2. Sahi farmaya;
"AUR TYAR RAKHU APNIE GHURAE TAKAE HAEBAT TARI HUJAE TUMHARAE DUSMANUU PAE"

Pehlay yeh tou dekh liya jayey keh hum mardon (males) nai kitnay ghorey tyaar kiyey huyey hien. An open question to all of us (including myself)....what is our contribution towards ISLAM from birth till this point. Hum nai engineering, medicine, business par kar KON SE GHORAY tyaar kar liyey hien. Have we done our part of obligation....jo FEMALES ko aagay kar rahey hien???

B)
Coming to the second part of the discussion.

Quote:
more over my dear friend quoting ayah and ahadis isn't enough u need Fatwa for that as just quotation of Ayah and Ahadis is not valid until you don’t know its shan-e-nazuul......
My friend what else you want. If qouting from Quran and then interpretation from Sunnah is not enough for us then what else we need.
Remember, QURAN is eternal. one cannot put time limits on its teaching.

Regarding FATWA, remember that every FATWA is based on first Quran & Sunnah, Sahaba, Tabein, and Taba-tabein. Another thing is FATWA is never given on the ruling which is already given in Quran and Sunnah (and agreed upon by majority of the scholars), rather on subjects which are not exclusively adressed in Quran. So, i request you to make it clear. Shan-e-nazul tells us the exact situation where the particular AYAH was revealed. It does not say that do not follow it today.
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First of all, it should be noted that Islam cares much for the perseverance of morals and the maintenance of modesty and chastity in the Muslim society. To achieve this goal, Islam requires the highest degree of cautiousness when dealing with the members of the opposite sex. A Muslim is always asked to keep very remote from anything that stimulates him or stirs his sexual urge. This includes looks, gestures, or free mixing.

The laws of Islam are from Allah, our Creator, who knows our weaknesses as well as our strengths better than we do. Women, by nature, desire to be looked at, adored and cherished, while man is inclined to look at women. Allah therefore warns us against our own nature, which may lead us astray if we do not exercise caution and take the necessary safeguards.

In the meantime, Islam has guaranteed the right of education for both men and women regarding it as an obligation upon every Muslim, male or female. The woman’s right to education is well established from the early days of Islam.

Undoubtedly, the free mixing of young boys and girls, close to the period of adolescence, in the relaxed environment of a school is very serious. It is a duty of Muslims to unite their efforts to eliminate this system in their countries and to set up schools, colleges and universities for both genders. Parents should search for separate schools to enroll their children. However, if a Muslim, male or female, is pressed to study at a mixed school, then he should exert his utmost to observe the Islamic standards of morality and keep away from all unlawful things.

Quote:
quoting ayah and ahadis isn't enough u need Fatwa for that

Addressing the issue of co-education, I’d like to cite the following fatwa:

“There is a well-known principle in Islamic law, which may be rendered in translation as "blocking the means (of evils)." This applies to any situation or condition which may be permissible in the first instance, but is calculated to lead to something forbidden. If it is generally deemed that there is a direct relationship between the original, permissible situation and the resulting forbidden one, then the original situation is pronounced as forbidden.

This is the prohibition of something which is acknowledged to be permissible in the first instance, because of the results it produces. In other words, should the circumstances change and the situation in question is deemed not to lead to the forbidden act, then it can no longer be pronounced as forbidden.

Co-education is one of such things. In the first instance, there is no harm in a group of people, men and women, boys and girls, to be present in a classroom, listening to a lecture, provided that everyone behaves properly, abiding by Islamic teachings and codes of conduct. But when we put together a group of young boys and girls, close to the period of adolescence, in the relaxed environment of a school where they meet and play, then it is asking too much of such young people to observe Islamic standards of morality. The results may be very serious indeed.

Therefore, we say that co-education is Islamically unacceptable, because of what it leads to, not because of the process of teaching or of the meeting of the two sexes in a classroom.”


Shedding more light on the issue, we’d like to state that "co-education is not an issue that has specifically been addressed by the Shari`ah. In other words, what we should keep in mind is the fact that co-education has not categorically been proscribed by the Almighty. However, there is no question about the view that it should be avoided, keeping in view the essence of the Islamic teachings regarding gender interaction and also the dictates of our intuition.

As far as the arguments in favor of co-education are concerned, the strongest argument put forth by its proponents, is the exhortation that Islam has extended to Muslims to allow their women into mosques and let them offer prayer in congregation if they want to. Why on earth should it not be allowed in schools and colleges then? This seems to be the strongest of all arguments offered by them since, through this, they manipulate a religious directive in their own favor.

A little deliberation here will reveal that there is a world of difference between the environment of a mosque and that of a school. In mosques, we indeed have an overwhelming feeling of the presence of the Almighty. Moreover, our intentions to visit and our concept regarding the sanctity of the mosque make a real difference in this respect. In spite of all this, Islam further enjoins certain etiquette to be observed by both Muslim men and women while they are in their Lord’s House. They are never allowed to intermingle freely or sit side by side. Ladies are directed to cover themselves properly and men have been directed to lower their gaze of which they become profoundly aware when they enter the sacred house. Is the situation with schools the same? Of course not. It is for this reason that co-education in schools and colleges must not be extrapolated on the basis of the permission given to women to attend mosques.

In fact, the tremendous loss caused by co-education is moral degeneration. The students are completely exposed to the opposite sex. Curiosity plays its role well in this regard. The wrong ideals set by the media and the awful bombardment of immoral images and characters fill the space left out by the germs of curiosity implanted by Satan. This reality coupled with the fact that they are mostly devoid of the supervision of any true and sincere mentor at school in that their teachers themselves do not present their students with a role model of morality, cause the innocent students to fall prey to the deadly predator of sexual impurity.

In co-education environments students have more opportunity and temptations to go astray. They cannot maintain the right etiquette of intermingling as prescribed by the Islamic Shari‘ah, at all times during school hours. Also, students in a co-education school might become more consumed by how they appear or present themselves to the opposite sex as compared to their studies.

Thus, the ideal situation that springs to mind when one takes into consideration the spirit of Islamic teachings and dictates of common sense is that provision of separate class rooms for male and female students is imperative. Therefore, it is incumbent upon the (Muslim) governments to make necessary arrangements in order to realize this end.

If in a developing country like Pakistan, the government is unable to provide separate classes for both sexes, they must take necessary steps to ensure that morality still plays an important role while deciding the curricular and extra-curricular activities of the institute in question. The underlying reason for this allowance is the stark reality that it is better to have some female doctors educated in an environment of co-education than to have our mothers and sisters be compelled to expose their private parts to male doctors in the time of ailment. Another step that the government must take in this regard is that they should very carefully choose the faculty of their institutes. All the teachers must be an embodiment of the values of decency and goodness. If these measures are taken, I am hopeful that the possibility of going astray will greatly decrease; though those at the helm of the state affairs will still be required to sincerely strive to provide separate campuses to their scholars, as soon as their funds allow them to.
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Lightbulb More Fatwas ????

AOA

@Last Island
Well said sister.

@ All members
Find some time to read the following Fatawa from Scholars;

Studying in mixed schools, institutes and universities is not permitted. The evils that exist in these institutions because of that mixing are no secret, let alone the fact that people do not learn much, if anything, in these institutions. Wise people even in kaafir countries have called for segregation between the sexes in educational institutions because of the moral damage they have noticed and the weakening of educational standards. Trustworthy have scholars have issued fatwas stating that this kind of education is not permissible.

The scholars of the Standing Committee said:
It is haraam for male and female students and teachers to mix in educational institutions, because of the fitnah and provocation of desires and immoral conduct that results from that. The gravity of the sin is compounded if the female teachers and students uncover any part of their ‘awrahs, or if the students or teachers flirt or joke together, which may lead to transgression of limits and violation of honour.
Fataawa Islamiyyah, 3/102, 103

In case where there is no option, and the need is great, the matter may come under the heading of necessity. This necessity may be taken into consideration, provided that the following conditions are met:
1. That there be no other place where he can study, even if it is in another country
2. That he cannot obtain this certificate by means of distance learning or studying via the internet, for example
3. That he goes to study in these mixed places seeking the help of Allaah to confront fitnah.
He should take care to lower his gaze as much as he can and not touch or shake hands with non-mahram women or be alone with them, and he should not sit right next to them.
He should advise the girls to sit away from the boys and adhere to other Islamic guidelines as well

4. If he notices himself slipping towards haraam things and being tempted by those of the opposite sex who are with him, then the soundness of his religious commitment is more important than any worldly aims, so he has to leave the place immediately and Allaah will make him independent of means by His bounty. And Allaah is the One Whose help we seek.
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Pehlay yeh tou dekh liya jayey keh hum mardon (males) nai kitnay ghorey tyaar kiyey huyey hien. An open question to all of us (including myself)....what is our contribution towards ISLAM from birth till this point. Hum nai engineering, medicine, business par kar KON SE GHORAY tyaar kar liyey hien. Have we done our part of obligation....jo FEMALES ko aagay kar rahey hien???






Military “GHURAE! lols”1
Cadet Jamil Ahmed Afridi of haonur in royal academy of London(common wealth (pakistan’s flag stood straight a foot up from other 23 countries

Air force

m.m Alam world record holder hope kisi taruuf k muhtaj nahee!

moreover
General Chuck Yeager, considered by many as the only person ever to be blessed with “the right stuff”, once remarked that Pakistan Air Force is their, and that’s worst fear .Pakistani pilots are respected throughout the world,because they know how to fly and fight.” –

Charles Horner, USAF (retd.), the chief architect of, and the mastermind behind, the air campaign against Iraq during the Gulf War. Quoted from his biography, “Every Man A Tiger
Khalid muhafiz zaraar are completely indigenous and super 7 andf7pg are two aircrafts with coleboration of china..
Ghauri shaheed hataf ghaznavi abdali
They say
“we’ll fall upon our foes like a thunder from a cloudless sky”

No lets have a look on medals and achievements of pak-Army


• Nishan-i-Haider / The Order of Haider -- This is Pakistan's highest decoration for the greatest acts of bravery in battle. The decoration may be awarded to any member of Pakistan's armed forces, regardless of rank or branch of service, for extraordinary bravery in the face of the enemy. It is, therefore, in the same category as Great Britain's Victoria Cross. The decoration carries with it an award of Rs. 10,000, plus monthly allowances for junior commissioned officers of Rs. 50/month and for non-commissioned officers and men of Rs. 25/month. Recipients may use the abbreviation N.H. after their names. The decoration takes its name after the famous military hero, Ali Haider (1722-82 C.E.). Established: 16 March 1957, by the President of Pakistan - No. F. 40(3)/Pres/57, Gazette of Pakistan 19 March 1957. Obverse: A five-pointed bronze star with star and crescent surrounded by a wreath in the center. The decoration is suspended by a scroll and bar bearing the name of the decoration "Nishan-i-Haider". Ribbon: Green moiré. When worn as a ribbon bar, the bar carries a bronze miniature of the decoration. Awards:
o IEC-9614 Captain Mohammad Sarwar, IPR, 27 July 1948 (posthumous)
o PA-10 Major-General Mohammad Ayub Khan, late 14th Punjabis, 30 November 1949
o PA-18 Brigadier General M. Hayaud-Din, MBE, MC, late FFR, 1 June 1948
o PA-24 Brigadier General Nawabzada Mohammad Sher Ali Khan, 1 November 1948
o PA-919 Major Mohammad Aslam Khan, MC, late FF Rifles, 24 May 1949
o IC-1902 Captain Zaffar Iqbal, 14th Punjab Regiment, 15 August 1948
o Major Tufail Mohammad, East Pakistan Rifles, 7 August 1958 (posthumous)
o Major Raja Aziz Bhatti, Punjab Regiment, 10 September 1965 (posthumous)
o Pilot Officer Rashid Minhas, Pakistan Air Force, 20 August 1971 (posthumous)
o Major Shabbir Shariff, 6th Frontier Force Regiment, 6 December 1971 (posthumous)
o Jawan Sowar Mohammad Hussein, 20th Lancers, 10 December 1971 (posthumous)
o Lance/Naik Mohammad Mahfuz, 15th Punjab Regiment, 17 December 1971 (posthumous)
o Major Mohammad Akram, 4th Frontier Force Regiment, 1971 (posthumous)
• Nishan-i-Pakistan / The Order of Pakistan -- Awarded for the highest degree of service to the state. Recipients are entitled to use post-nominal abbreviations as detailed below. Established: 19 March 1957, modified: 1975?? and 5 June 1986 (Gazette of Pakistan No S-1033/L7646 of 12 June 1986).
o Type 1 (1957-1975??): Obverse: While this differs by class, it is generally a ten-pointed gold star with gold rays between the points. The central medallion shows the coat of arms of Pakistan. The detailed descriptions and suspension styles differ by class; these are detailed below. Ribbon: These differ by class and are detailed below; in general, the ribbon is white and green.
 Nishan-i-Pakistan / Order of Pakistan (N.Pk., 1st class) - The ten-pointed 22-carat gold breast star (worn on the left breast) measures 3-1/4 inches across. The central medallion in enameled white and surrounded by a green band; the star is surmounted by a star and crescent. The ribbon is a 100-mm sash, worn over the right shoulder without a sash badge, white with green edges.
 Hilal-i-Pakistan / Crescent of Pakistan (H.Pk., 2nd class) - The 18-carat gold badge measures 2-5/8 inches across. The central medallion in enameled white and surrounded by a green band. The decoration is suspended from a gold crescent. The badge is worn around the neck from a 1 ¼ inch ribbon, white with green edges and a thin green center stripe.
 Sitara-i-Pakistan / Star of Pakistan (S.Pk., 3rd class) - The 14-carat gold badge measures 2-5/8 inches across. The central medallion in enameled white and surrounded by a green band. The decoration is suspended from a gold star. The badge is worn around the neck from a ribbon of white with green edges and two thin green center stripes.
 Tamgha-i-Pakistan / Medal of Pakistan (T.Pk., medal) - The circular bronze gilt medal measures 2-5/8 inches across. The central medallion in not enameled and carries the Pakistani emblem on the obverse. The decoration is worn as a breast badge and has an unadorned ring suspension. The ribbon is white with green edges and three thin green center stripes.
o Type 2 (1975??-1986): Unknown, probably similar to type 3, with a different central medallion.
o Type 3 (1986-): The badge comprising seven green enameled arms and seven sets of white enameled rays. On each of the seven arms a tiny crescent and star of silver-gilt, facing north-west, is superimposed. Between arms are placed sets of rays, each of three rays, the middle ray being slightly longer than the others. The center depicts, in relief, the Pakistan Coat-of-Arms, superimposed on an enameled ring, bearing the order's name in gold in Naskh script. The center and garter are, in turn, surrounded by a seven pointed silver star with a green enameled border. Star: similar to the badge but larger.
 Collar Chain, conferred to heads of states. The collar is of silver gilt and consists of the following parts: (1) Two serrated medallions bearing in relief, the Pakistan Coat of Arms, each measuring 55 mm in diameter, the two are placed in opposite directions one to rest on the back of the neck and the other to ocuppy the center at the front when worn. (2) Six black enameled circular medallions, each measuring 35 mm in diameter, with the crossed Pakistan flags superimposed thereon. (3) Six black enameled circular medallions, each measuring 35 mm in diameter, with the emblem of the President of Pakistan thereon in relief. (4) Six black enameled circular medallions, each measuring 35 mm in diameter, with the Pakistan Coat-of-Arms thereon in relief. The above mentioned medallions are joined together by a double row of silver gilt chain in the following order, commencing at the at the front in a clockwise direction : 1 / 2 3 4 / 2 3 4 / 2 3 4 / 1 (at the back center) 4 3 2 / 4 3 2 / 4 3 2 /.
 Nishan-i-Pakistan / Order of Pakistan (N.Pk., 1st class) - Obverse: 65 mm in diameter, of silver gilt, with the Pakistan Coat-of-Arms struck in 22 carat gold and the inscription "Nishan-i-Pakistan" in the green enameled ring. The badge is fitted with a reverse pin device for attachment to a bow of ribbon at the end of sash which is worn over the right shoulder. The star, 80 mm of diameter, with the same inscription, has the center in silver gilt and is worn on the left breast, centrally over the heart. The ribbon is a 102-mm sash, worn over the right shoulder, Pakistan green, white, Pakistan green, white, Pakistan green measuring 11 / 11 / 58 / 11 / 11 mm.
 Hilal-i-Pakistan / Crescent of Pakistan (H.Pk., 2nd class) - Obverse: 57 mm in diameter, of silver gilt, the ring bearing the inscription "Hilal-i-Pakistan." The badge is suspended from a ring and loop and worn around the neck from a collar ribbon. The star, 80 mm of diameter, with the same inscription has the center in silver and is worn on the left breast, centrally over the heart. The ribbon is 44 mm wide, Pakistan green, white, Pakistan green, white, Pakistan green measuring 5 / 5 / 24 / 5 / 5 mm.
 Sitara-i-Pakistan / Star of Pakistan (S.Pk., 3rd class) - Obverse: 57 mm in diameter, of silver, the ring bearing the inscription "Sitara-i-Pakistan." The badge is suspended from a ring and loop and worn around the neck from a collar ribbon. The ribbon is 44 mm wide, worn over the right shoulder, Pakistan green, white, Pakistan green, white, Pakistan green measuring 5 / 5 / 24 / 5 / 5 mm.
 Tamgha-i-Pakistan / Medal of Pakistan (T.Pk., 4th class) - Obverse: 42 mm in diameter, of bronze gilt, the ring bearing the inscription "Tamgha-i-Pakistan." The badge is suspended from a straight bar with laurel leaves and worn from a ribbon on the left breast. The ribbon is 32 mm wide, worn over the right shoulder, Pakistan green, white, Pakistan green, white, Pakistan green measuring 3 / 3 / 20 / 3 / 3 mm.
• Nishan-i-Shujaat / Order of Bravery -- Awarded for military and civilian acts of courage under circumstances of danger to oneself. In general, these are not acts of bravery performed under hostile fire or in combat situations. In very general terms, the decoration is similar to British's George Cross and George Medal. Recipients are entitled to use postnominal abbreviations as detailed below. Established: 19 March 1957. Modified: 5 June 1986 (Gazette of Pakistan No S-1033/L7646 of 12 June 1986).
o Type 1 (1957-1986): Obverse: oval medallion, description and suspension styles differ by class; these are detailed below. All the classes are worn as breast badges, with the addition of a sash for the first class.
 Nishan-i-Shujaat / Order of Bravery (N.St., 1st class) - A 22-carat gold oval medallion, 37 mm at its maximum diameter, with wreath at the edge and rays connecting the central medallion to the wreath. The central medallion is enameled in purple and has "???" or "Shujaat" ("Bravery") in gold, surrounded by a gold wreath. The medal is worn as a breast badge from a red ribbon, but in full dress a 100-mm red sash is worn over the right shoulder. The ribbon is plain red 32 mm of width. The decoration is suspended by a gold star and crescent. Until 1988, the Nishan-i-Shujaat had only been awarded once, to L/Naik Abdul Malik (in 1978).
 Hilal-i-Shujaat / Crescent of Bravery (H.St., 2nd class) - Similar to the first class, but in 18-carat gold and without the rays surrounding the central medallion. The ribbon is red with a narrow white stripe in the center. The decoration is suspended by a gold crescent. As of 1988, the Hilal-i-Shujaat had only been awarded once, to Muhammad Nur Khan (in 1978).
 Sitara-i-Shujaat / Star of Bravery (S.St., 3rd class) - Similar to the second class, but in 14-carat gold and suspended by a gold star. The ribbon is red with two thin central white stripes. As of 1988, the Sitara-i-Shujaat had been awarded forty-five times. To understand the award better, a sample recipient would be ???.
 Tamgha-i-Shujaat / Medal of Bravery (T.St., medal) - similar to the third class, but with in gilt bronze and with no enamel in the center and no suspension ornament. The ribbon is red with three thin white stripes in the center. As of 1988, the Tamgha-i-Shujaat had been awarded one hundred and eighty-eight times. To understand the award better, a sample recipient would be ???.
o Type 2 (1986-): Similar to the one described above, but different in details. The ribbon from 1987 is identical for all classes: red with a Pakistan green, white, Pakistan green central stripe, measuring 13 / 2 / 2 / 2 / 13 mm respectively.
 Nishan-i-Shujaat / Order of Bravery (N.St., 1st class) - as before, but of silver gilt, with the name of the order in gold in Naskh script on a background of red enamel. The badge is suspended from a straight silver-gilt bar with the the word "Nishan" in Naskh script. It is worn from a ribbon on the left breast with no additional sash.
 Hilal-i-Shujaat / Order of Bravery (H.St., 2nd class) - as above, but of silver, with the name of the order on a background of green enamel (although the statutes state the background as red!), and the word "Hilal" on the silver suspension bar.
 Sitara-i-Shujaat / Order of Bravery (S.St., 3rd class) - as above, but of oxidized bronze, with the word "Sitara" on the bronze suspension bar.
 Tamgha-i-Shujaat / Medal of Bravery (T.St., medal) - as above, but of oxidized bronze, without enamel and the word "Tamgha" on the bronze suspension bar.
• Nishan-i-Imtiaz / The Order of Performance -- Awarded for distinguished merit in the fields of literature, arts, sports, medicine, or science. Recipients are entitled to use postnominal abbreviations as detailed below. Established: 19 March 1957, modified 1975?? and 5 June 1986 (Gazette of Pakistan No S-1033/L7646 of 12 June 1986).
o Type 1 (1957-1975??): Obverse: A five-pointed gold star with gold rays between the points. In the center, a green-enameled medallion with the inscription "Imtiaz" (Performance) in gold; this is surrounded by a gold wreath and encircled by a blue-enameled band. The suspension differs by classes and is detailed below. Ribbon: Different for each class, but basically green, pale blue, and white; these differences are detailed below.
 Nishan-i-Imtiaz / Order of Performance (N.I., 1st class) - A 22-cartat gold breast star, worn on the right, with a gold star and crescent on the upper point. The ribbon is a 100-mm sash (worn over the right shoulder), green edged pale blue; there is no sash badge.
 Hilal-i-Imtiaz / Crescent of Performance (H.I., 2nd class) - A 1 ¼ inch badge in god, suspended by a gold crescent. The badge is worn as a neck badge from a 1 ¼ inch ribbon, green edged pale blue with a thin white center stripe.
 Sitara-i-Imtiaz / Star of Performance (S.I., 3rd class) - A gold badge, suspended by a gold star and worn as a neck badge. The ribbon is 1 ¼ inches wide and is green edged pale blue with two thin white center stripes.
 Tamgha-i-Imtiaz / Medal of Performance (T.I., medal) - The breast badge is an unenameled circular bronze gilt medal, suspended from an unadorned ring. The obverse has the legend "???" "Imtiaz" or "Performance", surrounded by a wreath. The ribbon is green edged pale blue with three thin white center stripes.
o Type 2 (1975??-1986): A five pointed star with ball points, each of the five polished rays. The five ball points rest on a circular laurel wreath, tied with crossed ribbons at four points. The upper center of the wreath depicts a crescent and star facing north-west. The central symbol varies with the class and is surrounded by a ring with the name of the class in Naskh script. There is a star attached to the upper two classes. The silver star is convex in shape and consists of ten points, the whole being faceted. A five pointed silver-gilt star with ball points is superimposed, each of the five silver-gilt polished rays. The center of the star varies with class and is surrounded by a ring with the name of the class. The ribbons of the particular classes are the same as before.
 Nishan-i-Imtiaz / Order of Performance (N.I., 1st class) - Obverse: 62 mm in diameter; the center having a crescent and star on green background, surrounded by a silver-gilt ring with the name of the class. The badge is fitted with a reverse pin device for attachment to a bow of ribbon at the end of sash which is worn over the right shoulder. The star is 80 mm in diameter, worn on the left breast.
 Hilal-i-Imtiaz / Crescent of Performance (H.I., 2nd class) - Obverse: 57 mm in diameter; the center having a only a crescent on green background, surrounded by a silver-gilt ring with the name of the class. The badge is suspended from a ring and loop and worn around the neck from a collar ribbon. The staris 80 mm in diameter, worn on the left breast.
 Sitara-i-Imtiaz / Star of Performance (S.I., 3rd class) - Obverse: 57 mm in diameter; the center having a only a star on green background, surrounded by a silver-gilt ring with the name of the class. The badge is suspended from a ring and loop and worn around the neck from a collar ribbon.
 Tamgha-i-Imtiaz / Medal of Performance (T.I., 4th class) - Obverse: bronze-gilt, 45 mm in diameter; the center having a crescent and star on non-enameled background, surrounded by a green ring with the name of the class. The badge is suspended from a straight bar with laurel leaves and worn from a ribbon on the left breast.
o Type 3 (1986-): Similar to the previous one, but the metal parts of the badges vary with class. The center always depicts a crescent and star facing north-west on non-enameled background, surrounded by a green enameled ring. This applies to the order star as well.
 Nishan-i-Imtiaz / Order of Performance (N.I., 1st class) - Obverse: 62 mm in diameter, silver-gilt. The badge is fitted with a reverse pin device for attachment to a bow of ribbon at the end of sash which is worn over the right shoulder. The star is 80 mm in diameter, worn on the left breast. The sash is 102 mm wide, yellow gold with a white, Pakistan green, white central stripe, measuring 36.5 / 12 / 5 / 12 / 36.5 mm respectively.
 Hilal-i-Imtiaz / Crescent of Performance (H.I., 2nd class) - Obverse: 57 mm in diameter, silver-gilt. The badge is suspended from a ring and loop and worn around the neck from a collar ribbon. The star is 80 mm in diameter, worn on the left breast. The ribbon is 44 mm wide, yellow gold with a white, Pakistan green, white central stripe, measuring 14 / 6.5 / 3 / 6.5 / 14 mm respectively.
 Sitara-i-Imtiaz / Star of Performance (S.I., 3rd class) - Obverse: 57 mm in diameter, silver. The badge is suspended from a ring and loop and worn around the neck from a collar ribbon. The ribbon is 44 mm wide, yellow gold with a white, Pakistan green, white central stripe, measuring 14 / 6.5 / 3 / 6.5 / 14 mm respectively.
 Tamgha-i-Imtiaz / Medal of Performance (T.I., 4th class) - Obverse: bronze-gilt, 45 mm in diameter. The badge is suspended from a straight bar with laurel leaves and worn from a ribbon on the left breast. The ribbon is 32 mm wide, yellow gold with a white, Pakistan green, white central stripe, measuring 12 / 6 / 2 / 6 / 12 mm respectively.
• Nishan-i-Quaid-i-Azam / The Order of the Great Leader -- Awarded for meritorious service to the state, both civilian and military. The decoration is named to commemorate the founder of the nation, Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah. Recipients are entitled to use postnominal abbreviations as detailed below. Established: 19 March 1957, modified 1975?? and 5 June 1986 (Gazette of Pakistan No S-1033/L7646 of 12 June 1986).
o Type 1 (1957-1975??): Obverse: An eight-pointed gold star, with gold rays between the points. The central medallion is enameled in violet and bears the gold inscription "Iman, Ittahad, Nazam" (Faith, Unity, Discipline). Suspension differs for each class and is detailed below. Ribbon: Basically, light gray, purple, and white, but the details differ for each class; these are detailed below.
 Nishan-i-Quaid-i-Azam / Order of the Great Leader (N.Q.A., 1st class) - A 3 ¼ inch breast star (worn on left breast), with a gold star and crescent on the upper point. The ribbon is a 100-mm sash (worn over right shoulder), with no sash badge, light gray with purple edges.
 Hilal-i-Quaid-i-Azam / Crescent of the Great Leader (H.Q.A., 2nd class) - A smaller badge worn as a neck badge and suspended by a gold crescent. The 1 ¼ inch ribbon is light gray with purple edges and a thin white center stripe.
 Sitara-i-Quaid-i-Azam / Star of the Great Leader (S.Q.A., 3rd class) - A neck badge, suspended by a gold star. The 1 ¼ inch ribbon is light gray with purple edges with two thin white center stripes.
 Tamgha-i-Quaid-i-Azam / Medal of the Great Leader (T.Q.A., medal) - A circular bronze gilt medal, unenameled, and the suspension is unadorned. The obverse has an ornate calligraphic rendering of "Iman, Ittahad, Nazam" ("Faith, Unity, Discipline"). The ribbon is light gray with purple edges with three thin white center stripes.
o Type 2 (1975??-1986): Unknown, may be similar to type 3.
o Type 3 (1986-): Comprises nine white enameled rays, each ray being divided into three parts. The nine white enameled rays are divided by narrow green enameled panels. Superimposed in the center is the effigy of Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jimah. This in turn is surrounded by a black enameled ring with the name of the order. The ring is encircled by an ornamental border of leaves. The star is similar to the badge but larger.
 Nishan-i-Quaid-i-Azam / Order of the Great Leader (N.Q.A., 1st class) - Obverse: 62 mm in diameter, silver-gilt. The badge is fitted with a reverse pin device for attachment to a bow of ribbon at the end of sash which is worn over the right shoulder. The star is 80 mm in diameter with che center of silver gilt, worn on the left breast. The sash is 102 mm wide, with stripes of white, Pakistan green, black, Pakistan green, white, measuring 28 / 20 / 6 / 20 / 28 mm respectively.
 Hilal-i-Quaid-i-Azam / Order of the Great Leader (H.Q.A., 2nd class) - Obverse: 57 mm in diameter, silver-gilt. The badge is suspended from a ring and loop and worn around the neck from a collar ribbon. The star is 80 mm in diameter, with the center of silver, worn on the left breast. The ribbon is 44 mm wide, with stripes of white, Pakistan green, black, Pakistan green, white, measuring 11.5 / 9 / 3 / 9 / 11.5 mm respectively.
 Sitara-i-Quaid-i-Azam / Order of the Great Leader (S.Q.A., 3rd class) - Obverse: 57 mm in diameter, silver. The badge is suspended from a ring and loop and worn around the neck from a collar ribbon. The ribbon is 44 mm wide, with stripes of white, Pakistan green, black, Pakistan green, white, measuring 11.5 / 9 / 3 / 9 / 11.5 mm respectively.
 Tamgha-i-Quaid-i-Azam / Order of the Great Leader (T.Q.A., 4th class) - Obverse: 39 mm in diameter, bronze-gilt. The badge is suspended from a straight bar with palm leaves and worn from a ribbon on the left breast. The ribbon is 32 mm wide, with stripes of white, Pakistan green, black, Pakistan green, white, measuring 10 / 7.5 / 3 / 7.5 / 10 mm respectively.
• Nishan-i-Khidmat, Civil / The Order of Service -- Awarded for general meritorious civilian service to the state. Recipients are entitled to use postnominal abbreviations, as detailed below. While not uniquely a civilian decoration, the Nishan-i-Khidmat essentially filled this niche, with the Tamgah-i-Khidmat serves as a military division. Established: The third and fourth classes were established on 19 March 1957 and the first and second classes added in 1960. The order was modified in 1975?? and on 5 June 1986 (Gazette of Pakistan No S-1033/L7646 of 12 June 1986).
o Type 1 (1957-1975??): Obverse: A five-pointed gold star, 1-15/16 inches in diameter. The center has a white-enameled circular medallion bearing a red-enameled square with the name of the decoration in gold. The suspension styles differ according to class, and these are detailed below. Ribbon: Basically, red and white, but the ribbon differs by class; this is detailed below.
 Nishan-i-Khidmat / Order of Service (N.K., 1st class) - A gold rayed breast star, with a gold star and crescent on the upper point, and the legend "???" "Khidmat-i-Ala". The breast star is worn on the left breast, while the ribbon is a 100-mm sash without badge (worn over the right shoulder), white with red edges.
 Hilal-i-Khidmat / Crescent of Service (H.K., 2nd class) - Smaller than first class and suspended by a gold crescent; the badge is worn as a neck badge. The 1 ¼ inch ribbon is white with red edges and a thin red center stripe.
 Sitara-i-Khidmat / Star of Service (S.K., 3rd class) - Similar to second class, but suspended as a neck badge by a gold star. The 1 ¼ inch ribbon is white with red edges and two thin red center stripes.
 Tamgha-i-Khidmat / Medal of Service (T.K., 4th class) - A circular bronze gilt medal, worn as a breast badge but without enamel and no distinctive suspension device. The obverse has a framed square with the legend "Khidmat-i-Ala". The ribbon is white red edges and with three thin red center stripes. - It is important to distinguish between this award and the military Tamgah-i-Khidmat (see 02000).
 Sanad-i-Khidmat / Certificate of Service - A certificate linked to the order, but (apparently?) without an insignia.
o Type 2 Type 1 (1975??-1986): Unknown, may be similar to type 3.
o Type 3 (1986-): The obverse comprises nine main rays, each containing five lesser rays. Superimposed on the silver star are nine enameled rays. Six of these rays are green enameled, while three are black enameled, the latter being placed at 12, 4 and 8 o'clock, with two green rays between each black. The center depicts a circular laurel wreath within which is the name of the class in Naskh script. The star of the order is similar to the badge but larger, with a tiny crescent and star facing north-west in each of the nine angles of the superimposed enameled star.
 Nishan-i-Khidmat / Order of Service (N.K., 1st class) - The obverse is 62 mm in diameter, of silver gilt. The badge is fitted with a reverse pin device for attachment to a bow of ribbon at the end of sash which is worn over the right shoulder. The star is 80 mm in diameter with the center of silver gilt, worn on the left breast. The sash is 102 mm wide, with stripes of black, white, Pakistan green, white, black, measuring 28 / 19.5 / 7 / 19.5 / 28 mm respectively.
 Hilal-i-Khidmat / Order of Service (H.K., 2nd class) - The obverse is 57 mm in diameter, of silver gilt. The badge is suspended from a ring and loop and worn around the neck from a collar ribbon. The star is 80 mm in diameter with the center of silver, worn on the left breast. The ribbon is 44 mm wide, with stripes of black, white, Pakistan green, white, black, measuring 11.5 / 9 / 3 / 9 / 11.5 mm respectively.
 Sitara-i-Khidmat / Order of Service (S.K., 3rd class) - The obverse is 57 mm in diameter, of silver. The badge is suspended from a ring and loop and worn around the neck from a collar ribbon. The ribbon is 44 mm wide, with stripes of black, white, Pakistan green, white, black, measuring 11.5 / 9 / 3 / 9 / 11.5 mm respectively.
 Tamgha-i-Khidmat / Order of Service (T.K., 4th class) - The obverse is 42 mm in diameter, of bronze gilt. The ribbon is 38 mm wide, with stripes of black, white, Pakistan green, white, black, measuring 11 / 7 / 2 / 7 / 11 mm respectively.
• President's Award for Pride of Performance -- Established on 13th January 1983 by president Zia-Ul-Haq (Gazette of Pakistan No 1/10/79 of 20 January 1983). Awarded in a single class upon Pakistani nationals in recognition of notable achievement in the fields of art, science, literature, sports or nursing. The award of the medal may be accompanied by a monetary award. The president of Pakistan reserves himself the right to confer the award, unaccompanied by a monetary award, upon persons who are not citizens of Pakistan. The badge is round in shape, of gold plated silver, measuring 53 mm in diameter. The obverse bears a star and crescent on the central disk. The surrounding circle contains the award's name in Urdu. The reverse is plain. The badge is suspended from a ring and loop and worn around the neck from a collar ribbon. The ribbon is 38 mm wide, with stripes of yellow gold, Pakistan green, white, Pakistan green, yellow gold, measuring 7 / 8 / 8 / 8 / 7 mm respectively.
• Hilal-i-Jur'at / Crescent of Courage -- Awarded to officers for acts of valor, courage, or devotion to duty in the face of the enemy. The award carried the right to use the postnominal abbreviation H.J. This decoration is a rough equivalent to the British Distinguished Service Order. Established: 16 March 1957, by the President of Pakistan - No. F. 40(3)/Pres/57, Gazette of Pakistan 19 March 1957. Obverse: A circular gold medal, with a star and crescent in the center, surrounded by ten bundles of leaves. The medal is suspended from a gold bar with the name of the decoration "Hilal-i-Jur'at". Ribbon: 1 ¼ inches, green moiré with a broad central red stripes; equal stripes green, red, green.
• Sitara-i-Jur'at / Star of Courage -- Awarded to officers, junior commissioned officers, and warrant officers for gallantry and distinguished services in the face of the enemy. The award carried the right to use S.J. as a postnominal abbreviation. Junior Commissioned Officers were eligible to receive a monthly allowance of Rs. 30. The decoration is roughly comparable to the British Military Cross. Established: 16 March 1957, by the President of Pakistan - No. F. 40(3)/Pres/57, Gazette of Pakistan 19 March 1957. Obverse: A pentagonal silver medal with a five-pointed star in the center and rays and stars between the points. The medal is suspended from an ornamental bar with the name of the decoration, "Sirata-i-Jur'at". Ribbon: Equal stripes of white, green, white.
• Tamgha-i-Jur'at / Medal of Courage -- Awarded to non-commissioned officers and enlisted men for gallantry and distinguished services in the face of the enemy. The award carried the right to use the postnominal abbreviation T.J. and, for non-commissioned officers and enlisted men, a monthly allowance of Rs. 15. The decoration is roughly comparable to the British Distinguished Conduct Medal. Established: 16 March 1957, by the President of Pakistan - No. F. 40(3)/Pres/57, Gazette of Pakistan 19 March 1957. Obverse: A circular bright bronze medal with a star and crescent in the center, surrounded by a trophy of arms and entirely surrounded by a wreath. The medal is suspended from an ornamental straight-bar suspender. Ribbon: Equal stripes of green (to wearer's right) and red, edged on both sides with white.
• Sitara-i-Basalat and Tamgha-i-Basalat / Star of Good Conduct and Medal of Good Conduct -- Awarded to all ranks of the Pakistani military for valor, courage, or devotion to duty while not in combat. Recipients of the award are entitled to use postnominal abbreviations as detailed below. The award was originally established as the Tamgha-i-Basalat, Class I and Class II. The name was later altered. It is not clear what changes in design - if any - this entailed. Established: 16 March 1957, by the President of Pakistan - No. F. 40(3)/Pres/57, Gazette of Pakistan 19 March 1957. Obverse: A circular medal (silver for first class and bronze for second class) with a narrow wreath around the outside margin, with the emblems of the three services: crossed swords and an anchor surmounted by a pair of wings and, above them, a star. The medal is suspended from an ornamental straight bar with the name of the decoration "Sitara-i-Basalat" or "Tamgha-i-Basalat," depending on class and era of award. Tamgha-i-Basalat Class I awards have that inscription, while post-19?? awards have the new name on the silver medal. Ribbon: Differs by class, see below.
o first class - silver medal - ribbon dark blue, with light blue edges and red edge stripes:
 Tamgha-i-Basalat, Class I (T.I.B. [I]) - legend "???"
 Sitara-i-Basalat (S.Bt.) '' legend "???"
o Tamgha-i-Basalat (T.I.B.[II] or T.Bt) - bronze medal - ribbon light blue, with dark blue edges and red edge stripes
• The Quaid-i-Azam Police Medal for Gallantry -- Ribbon: Five (essentially) equal stripes, white, blue, white, blue, white, each white stripe has a thin green center stripe.
• President's Police Medal for Gallantry -- Established 19??. May be similar to the previous one but nothing else is known about this medal.
• I'zaz-i-Kamal -- Established 19??. Nothing else is known about this award.
• I'zaz-i-Fazeelat -- Established 19??. Nothing else is known about this award.
• I'zaz-i-Sabqat -- Established 19??. Nothing else is known about this award.
• President's Medal for Technology -- Established 19??. Conferred probably for achievement in the area of technology but nothing else is known about this medal.
• President's Award for Children -- Established 19??. Nothing else is known about this award.
• Imtiazi Sanad -- Established 19??. Nothing else is known about this award.
• Tamgha-i-Diffa / Medal of Service -- Established as a general service medal for award to all members of the Pakistani military and semi-military forces, to members of states' forces, and to British officers and men serving with Pakistan's armed forces. The initial statute allowed the use of the postnominal abbreviation "T.D." for those who had been awarded this decoration, but this provision seems never to have been placed into effect. Established: 16 March 1957, by the President of Pakistan - No. F. 40(3)/Pres/57, Gazette of Pakistan 19 March 1957. Obverse: 36-mm circular copper-nickel medal. Star and crescent in the center, surrounded by a wreath. Above, the inscription "" or "Khidmat-i-Pakistan" or "The Service of Pakistan." Suspended from an ornate straight-bar swiveling suspender and a bar with the campaign relevant to the award; bars both in English and bilingual bars in Urdu/Bengali have been seen. The medal is rarely seen named. The medal has also been seen and reported in gilt, but this seems to be a totally unofficial modification. Reverse: Plain, open circle in the center. When named, the naming might be here? Ribbon: 33 mm, green, with central stripes of dark blue, red, light blue, edged with thinner white stripes. Green 7 mm, white 2 mm, dark blue 5 mm, red 5 mm, light blue 5 mm, white 2 mm, green 7 mm.

• Istar-i-Herb 1385 / War Star 1385 [A.H. = 1965 C.E.] -- Awarded for combat service in the 1965 Indo-Pakistani War. Obverse: A bronze seven-pointed rayed star, 35-mm. In the center, the Shahadat ("There is no God but God and Muhammad is His Messenger"), surrounded by the name of the medal on a circular band, "Istar-i-Herb" in Urdu and Bengali. The medal is suspended from an ornate straight-bar non-swiveling suspender. Reverse: Plain, a central circle, within which the medal is named (although it is often encountered unnamed). Ribbon: 33 mm, black, with a central 5 mm red stripe. Black 14 mm, red 5 mm, black 14 mm.
• Istar-i-Herb 1971 / War Star 1971 -- Awarded for combat service in the 1971 Indo-Pakistani War. Obverse.
• 1385 Tamgha-i-Jang / 1385 [A.H. = 1965 C.E.] War Medal -- Awarded for general service in the 1965 Indo-Pakistani War. Obverse: 37 mm, circular, copper-nickel. In the center, the star and crescent, above the insignia of the Pakistani army, to the left that of the Pakistani navy, and to the right the crest of the air force. The medal is suspended from a plain non-swiveling straight-bar suspender. The medal is usually unnamed. Reverse: In the center, the date "1385" (A.H. = 1965 C.E.) in Urdu and Bengali. Above, the curved Urdu inscription "???" or "???" and, below, the same in Bengali, "???", separated by wreaths of each side. Ribbon: 31 mm, green, with edge stripes (reading inwards) of light blue, dark blue, red. Light blue 3 mm, dark blue 3 mm, red 3 mm, green 13 mm, red 3 mm, dark blue 3 mm, light blue 3 mm.
• 1971 Tamgha-i-Jang / 1971 War Medal -- Awarded for general service in the 1971 Indo-Pakistani War. Obverse: 37 mm, circular, copper-nickel. In the center, there is the star and crescent, above the insignia of the Pakistani army, to the left that of the Pakistani navy, and to the right the crest of the air force. The medal is suspended from a plain non-swiveling straight-bar suspender. The medal is usually unnamed. Ribbon: Green with a central stripe of light blue / dark blue / red.
• The Pakistan Medal -- Awarded to commemorate Pakistan's indepencence in August 1947. Established: 1948. Obverse: 37 mm, circular copper-nickel. The Pakistani flag in the center, surrounded by a wreath. Above, the Urdu inscription "???" or "???". Below, the date "??" or "15 August 1947". Suspended from a straight non-swiveling bar suspender. Frequently named on the edge. Reverse: In the center, the monogram of King George VI (the new one), "GVIR" and the inscription "GEORGIVS VI D.G. BR. OMN. REX." Ribbon: 31 mm, green with a 3 mm white center strips. Green 14 mm, white 3 mm, green 14 mm.
• Tamgha-i-Jamhuria 1375 / Republic Medal, 1956 -- Awarded to commemorate the inauguration of the Republic of Pakistan, 23 March 1956. Awarded to members of the Pakistani armed forces, police forces, selected civilian officials, and selected non-officials. The medal was also awarded in gold to heads of foreign delegations attending the inauguration ceremonies as official State representatives. Established: 16 March 1957, by the President of Pakistan - No. F. 40(2)/Pres/57, Gazette of Pakistan 19 March 1957. Obverse: 37-mm circular gold or copper-nickel medal. Within a wreath, calligraphic inscription "Jamhuria Islamia Pakistan" or "The Islamic Republic of Pakistan". The medal is suspended from an ornate straight-bar swiveling suspender. The medal is usually encountered unnamed. Reverse: The date of the establishment of Pakistan as a republic. In the center, straight across, in English "23rd MARCH 1956", above, curved, the same date in Urdu "9 Shaaban-ul-Muazzam 1375", and below, curved, in Bengali "Jamhuria Islamia Pakistan" or "The Islamic Republic of Pakistan". Ribbon: 32 mm, equal stripes of green, red, black, and white. Green 8 mm, red 8 mm, black 8 mm white 8 mm.
• Pakistan Republic Medal -- An otherwise unreported private (?) medal commemorating the establishment of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan. Obverse.
• Tamgha-i-Khidmat (Military) / Medal of Service (Military) -- Awarded for long and meritorious service of a distinguished nature. Recipients of the award are entitled to use postnominal abbreviations as detailed below. In many ways, this serves as a military class paralleling the Nishan-i-Khidmat; it is important to distinguish between this award and the Tamgah-i-Khidmat that is the fourth class of the Nishan-i-Khidmat. This decoration also represented somewhat of an overlap with the older, pre-1947, Order of British India and no soldier could be awarded the Tamgha-i-Khidmat who held the O.B.I. 1st class. Established: 16 March 1957, by the President of Pakistan - No. F. 40(3)/Pres/57, Gazette of Pakistan 19 March 1957. Obverse: A ten-pointed faceted star (metals vary by class, see below) with a superimposed five-pointed white-enameled star with a star and crescent in the center. Suspended as a neck badge from a suspender with the name of the decoration "Tamgha-i-Khidmat". Ribbon: Basically crimson and white, but it differs by class; see detailed comments below.
o 1st class (T.K.I) - The star is in gold. The ribbon is crimson with a central white stripe. Awarded only to those who held the T.K.II or O.B.I. 2nd class. The award carried a monthly stipend of Rs. 40. On retirement, the awardee was to be granted the rank of Honorary Captain (if a Risaldar-Major or Subadar-Major) or Honorary Lieutenant (if a Risaldar, Subadar, or Jemadar).
o 2nd class (T.K.II) - The star is in silver. The ribbon is crimson with two white side stripes. Not to be awarded to those who already held the O.B.I. 2nd class. The decoration carried with it a monthly stipend of Rs. 25.
o 3rd class (T.K.III) - The star is in bronze. The ribbon is crimson with white side stripes and a white center stripe.
• President's Meda1 for Best Shot -- Established 19??. Nothing else is known about this medal.
• Wiladat-i-Quaid-i-Azam / ??? -- Awarded to commemorate the birth centenary of Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah (1876-19??), the founder and first Prime Minister of Pakistan, on 25 December 1976. Obverse.
• Hijri Medal / ??? -- Issued to commemorate the completion of the fourteenth century of the Hijri era on 22 November 1979. Obverse.
• Pakistan Police Medal for Meritorious Service -- Ribbon: Five (essentially) equal stripes of white, blue, amaranth, blue, white, with the central amaranth stripe having a thin green center stripe.
• Pakistan Police Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct -- Ribbon: Five (essentially) equal stripes of white, blue, white, blue, white, with the central white stripe having a thin green center stripe.
• UNITED NATIONS: Operations des Nations Units au Congo (ONUC), July 1960-June 1964
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Transition Assistance Group (UNTAG), April 1989-March 1990
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Angola Verification Mission, UNAVEM I, January 1989-June 1991, UNAVEM II, June 1991-February 1995, and UNAVEM III, February 1995-June 1997
• UNITED NATIONS: Mission des nations unies pour le referendum dans le Sahara Occidental (MINURSO), September 1991--
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Advance Mission in Cambodia (UNAMIC), November 1991-March 1992
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR), March 1992-December 1995
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC), March 1992-September 1993
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Iraq-Kuwait Observation Mission (UNIKOM), April 1991--
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Operations in Somalia , UNOSOM I, April 1992-April 1993, and UNOSOM II, May 1993-March 1995
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Operation in Mozambique (ONUMOZ), December 1992-December 1994
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia (UNOMIG), August 1993--
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Observer Mission in Liberia (UNOMIL), September 1993--
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Mission in Haiti (UNMIH), September 1993-June 1996
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Assistance Mission in Rwanda (UNAMIR), October 1993-March 1996
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Confidence Restoration Operation (UNCRO), March 1995-January 1996
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Preventative Deployment Force (UNPREDEP), March 1995--
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMIBH), December 1995--
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Transitional Administration for Eastern Slavonia, Baranja, and Western Sirmium (UNTAES), January 1996--
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Mission of Observers in Prevalka (UNMOP), January 1996--
• UNITED NATIONS: United Nations Observer Mission in Angola (MONUA), July 1997—
Education and medicine fields/Missilinous l
1
Mr. Zafar Altaf
awarded medal of apriciation, and seat of agricultural economist from U.N.O for south and south east asia on extra ordinary work

2
Dr.shahid bajwa
Presidentship of American college of neuro seargon he is hope still so,

3
Dr. Umar Chhapra
is a shining star among those Pakistani Memons who have acquired higher education. He is one of the scholars who has got his higher education as a scholar of All Pakistan Memon Educational and Welfare Society. He has utilised his scholarship by rendering services to Muslim countries in the field of economics. He is presently serving as financial advisor in the Finance and Monetary Agency of the Saudi Government and is enjoying a prestigious status there.

4
DR.OMER jooma
.Dr. Jooma, a doctor of international fame
In 195 1, he returned to Karachi and joined Jinnah Hospital. In 1952, when the Ceylonese Prime Minister, Mr. Senanaike, received brain injuries while horse-riding, Dr. Jooma, who by that time had attained fame world over, was summoned to Ceylon particularly for treatment
5
Abdul Aziz Al-Memony
Among the scholars of international repute, Allama Abdul Aziz Al-Memony's name ranks foremost. This world famous religious scholar, whom even the Arabs called "Ustad" (teacher) has not received due recognition from his own community or country.

6
A. Karim Admani (Dr.)
He is the first ever non-British doctor to be member of Medical Council of England in 150 years of its history.
.

7
Dr. Farzana Usman
lost her eyesight at a very early age but continued her studies from verginia university. She was able to obtain a Masters degree and after that she also received her Ph.D. degree. She may be called the "Helen Keller" of Pakista


8
AMBASSADOR AHMAD KAMAL
Ambassador Ahmad Kamal served as a professional diplomat in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Pakistan for close to forty years until his retirement in 1999. During this period he held diplomatic postings in India, Belgium, France, the Soviet Union, Saudi Arabia, the Republic of Korea, and with the United Nations both in Geneva and in New York. During his decade long assignment as Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Pakistan to the United Nations, he held many of the highest elective posts, as Vice President of the General Assembly, President of the Economic and Social Council, Chairman of the Consultations on the Role of NGOs at the United Nations, Chairman of the Working Group on Informatics, and Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the United Nations Institute of Training and Research. He was the chief negotiator of Pakistan in the Uruguay Round negotiations which led to the establishment of the World Trade Organisation.
9
Uno’s co-ordinator for iraq today is also a Pakistani he is awarded this seat for his extra ordinary performance in the field of diplomacy…
10
CAMB is the only dedicated laboratory in Pakistan engaged in forensic DNA research. It provides research in the field of forensic science and provides DNA testing in criminal cases, including violent crimes, mass disasters and paternity disputes. Dr. Tahir, of Strand Analytical Labs in Indianapolis, actively assisted Pakistani scientists in establishing this first and only full-scale DNA lab in the nation of Pakistan.

11
Dr. Samar Mubarakmand
has been associated with a variety of classified scientific programmes in Pakistan. He joined the (PAEC) in 1962, where he was in charge of the Directorate of Technical Development, one of the most secretive institutes within Pakistan and completely unknown to the outside world. He reportedly supervised several cold tests in 1983, and also developed a neutron facility for acceleration of explosion process in a nuclear device. In 1990s, he served as the Director General of national defence comples, another Pakistani organization shrouded in secrecy. He was appointed as the first Chairman of Pakistan's Nationa Engeering and scientific commission (NESCOM) in 2001. He is now considered the main architect of Pakistan's missile program, which includes systems such as the Babur missile, Shaheen missile series, and the Ghaznavi missile system.One of his recent landmark achievements is the establishment of Centers of Excellence (COEs) in the fields of Computational Science and Medicine, Control & Instrumentation, Fluid Dynamics & Engineering Design, Hydro Technologies, Wireless Communication, and Electronics and Composite Materials. These COEs are fast becoming the hub of advance scientific and medical activity in Pakistan, conducting research in areas such as stem cells, tissue culture technology, and production of cardiac stents.
Hope I don’t need to quote sports stars and A.Qdaeer the great






Note:The Above military medal information is taken from site...
well this was just a short go through... yae wo log hien jin ko dunya janti hai par hum nahee..
my friend hope u just underestimated your people....

As for as fatwas are concerned i respect them but my first post in which I have emphasized on the institute of ijtihad is for this reason...
As for as Islamic contribution on Pakistani people's part..
u must than be knowing that
PAKISTAN IS THE MARKAZ OF WORLD TABLEEGHI JAMAAT

And as for as quotation of Ayah and Hades only without Shan-e-nazuul is concerened
Pope bandict also quoted Quran's surah tuba..
Mafhuum
"aur jab yae hurmat k char maheenie guzar jien tu ghat mien bethu un k gaga gaga aur katal karo un ko nasewae unkae ju kalama parhie aur aman mien ajien"
That islam has spread through sword.. lolz what will u assume should we start doing so? as its in Quran right ?aur sunnah sae sabit bhi huwa hai
but this ayah was paticularly for mushrkeen and munafqeen.. he didn't knw the shan-e-nazool too....
Than again during lal masjid issue pak govt was displaying Ayah of surah-e-tauuba regarding demolition of masjid-e-zaraar..
Note "Hazuur nien wo masjid gira di thi" so sunnah sae sabit bhi hai ayyah!
Which doesn’t fit here as those were revealed munafiks by Allah Almighty himself upon Messenger..

U see shan-e-nazool/ paticular conditions does matter....
__________________
BJ

Last edited by Princess Royal; Monday, May 17, 2010 at 10:56 PM.
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